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Coat Of Arms
10-03-2008, 01:53 AM,
#16
Coat Of Arms
he can't read it - he got banned
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10-03-2008, 01:55 AM,
#17
Coat Of Arms
ISH = MAN

Even though the English word Adam is always translated from the Hebrew adam, the words man and men throughout the KJV Bible are not only translated from the Hebrew adam but in most cases they are translated from the Hebrew word ish (starting with with Genesis 2:23, 24; 3:6, 16; 4:1, 23; and elsewhere) or from other Hebrew words; and the KJV words person and persons are translated occasionally from the Hebrew adam, but in most occurances of the words person and persons, these words are translated from Hebrew nephesh or other Hebrew words. For further details see the "Summary of use of the Hebrew word adam and the English word man in the KJV" below.

Source: http://www.bibletexts.com/terms/heb-adam.htm

http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=ish+hebrew
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10-03-2008, 01:56 AM,
#18
Coat Of Arms
Why did he get banned?
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01-11-2013, 09:19 PM,
#19
RE: Coat Of Arms
[quote='Midfield.Enforcer' pid='150202' dateline='1222776518']
Quote:The word BRIT-ISH is Hebrew and it means "the people of the Covenant", in other words "the People Israel" - ALL of whom are HEBREWS (NOT Jews).


That's just not true. If you get a dictionary (or just use Wikipedia - the entry is pretty much the same) you will find the etymological roots of the word British and it isn't Hebrew/Jewish. It's Latin/Roman!!

etymology goes further back than latin/roman. using the dictionary and wikipedia is like using a high school book to answer university questions. shame on you! x
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01-12-2013, 12:19 AM,
#20
RE: Coat Of Arms
It's funny when you look at the age of Yiddish, the earliest known traces of it were found in 950 ad near the rhine, whereas, the Roamans began their invasion in 43 AD...

The Roman thesis predates the existence of Yiddish.
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01-12-2013, 02:44 PM,
#21
RE: Coat Of Arms
(01-12-2013, 12:19 AM)psilocybin Wrote: It's funny when you look at the age of Yiddish, the earliest known traces of it were found in 950 ad near the rhine, whereas, the Roamans began their invasion in 43 AD...

The Roman thesis predates the existence of Yiddish.

looking into etymology over the past few years i have seen that it goes back and back. i think onomatopoeia is to blame some what. perhaps it's like a tree, and your language is an apple, everything boiling down to the same place.
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