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Wolves in Government Clothing (Documentary)
10-17-2013, 04:46 PM,
#1
Video  Wolves in Government Clothing (Documentary)
This looks like an interesting documentary. A friend of mine is involved in working with the counties and states involved in the wolf reintroduction programs and thinks these wolves are just another way for the government to control the people in numerous ways. I cant say I disagree. It was done in Russia back in the day, now they're doing it here.

The so called environmental protection groups have to know what kind of impact these predatory animals are having on the population of people, but its clear they could care less. Even more so though is the impact that these predators are having on the wildlife as well. Something these environmentalist green nazis dont even realize.

One of the people interviewed is Wink of X Diamond Ranch. I've stayed on Wink's ranch in AZ. It's a beautiful place, and a shame that people that are just trying to make an honest living have to deal with these animals that they are not allowed to protect themselves or their property against an attack.
As far as I know, this isnt the full documentary, but a good chunk of it to detail what it is about.



"Listen to everyone, read everything, believe nothing unless you can prove it in your own research"
~William Cooper

DTTNWO!
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10-17-2013, 09:04 PM, (This post was last modified: 10-17-2013, 09:08 PM by fujiinn.)
#2
RE: Wolves in Government Clothing (Documentary)
Wolves are an integral part of an healthy ecosystem: http://oregonstate.edu/ua/ncs/archives/2011/dec/yellowstone-transformed-15-years-after-return-wolves

Oregon State University - Predators, Bill Ripple




What do you mean people aren't allowed to defend themselves against wolf attacks?
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10-17-2013, 09:57 PM,
#3
RE: Wolves in Government Clothing (Documentary)
No one is saying that all wolves need to be eradicated. And its common knowledge that wolves, and other large predators are important to a healthy ecosystem. That doesnt change the fact that they are no longer as endangered as they used to be and are now spreading into other areas they were never meant to be. This causes problems for the people that live and make a living in those areas. It also infringes on rights of the people's use of resources in those areas. Delisting is something that needs to be looked at again.
In most of the Northwest and Southwest, ranchers, livestock owners and operators DO NOT have authority to kill wolves. Outside of a few small delisted zones, wolves are still listed as an endangered species and are fully protected under the Endangered Species Act. If someone lives in the areas where wolves are protected, then you have to call the USFWS to deal with them or face harsh penalties.
"Listen to everyone, read everything, believe nothing unless you can prove it in your own research"
~William Cooper

DTTNWO!
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10-18-2013, 12:01 AM, (This post was last modified: 10-18-2013, 12:17 AM by mexika.)
#4
RE: Wolves in Government Clothing (Documentary)
Little Red Ridding in the Hood.





Has any human being killed by wolves. Do they attack humans as well, or why are they attacking cattle, sheep; is it because the wolf has been attacked first by the civilized humans, and I do not think wolves kill for sport?
Unite The Many, defeat the few.

Revolution is for the love of your people, culture, knowledge, wisdom, spirit, and peace. Not Greed!
Soul Rebel Native Son


http://video.google.ca/videoplay?docid=277...enous&hl=en
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10-18-2013, 01:25 AM,
#5
RE: Wolves in Government Clothing (Documentary)
While watching this short documentary, I did think of something. The wolf expert, Shaun Ellis discovered that if you play a recording of wolves howling near your farm at night... it will keep other packs of wolves away. Wolves communicate with their own packs and other packs by howling... like a vocal gesture of territorial domination. All these farmers need to do is test this method, and it could solve a lot of their livestock issues.
This documentary elaborates on the issue 29 minutes in.





I'm glad you brought this up silva. The re-wilding of many populated and inhibited areas is just another goal and plan of Agenda 21... which so called "environmentalists" inadvertently play into. I know the laws differ by state, so I'm compelled to look into it more, and I will.
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10-18-2013, 04:42 AM,
#6
RE: Wolves in Government Clothing (Documentary)
That's exactly it April. Agenda 21. Those states in the Northwest & Southwest are fighting all kinds of Agenda 21 related attacks on their land usually in regards to some form of listing or another of a so called "new" species that really aren't new at all. Once those species are listed as "protected" then the fundamental rights to the resources get taken from everyone (native indians, non native indians alike)in those areas.
"Listen to everyone, read everything, believe nothing unless you can prove it in your own research"
~William Cooper

DTTNWO!
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10-18-2013, 04:09 PM,
#7
Video  RE: Wolves in Government Clothing (Documentary)
It's not just about the Wolves. Its much bigger then that. I think the makers of this documentary are just trying to focus on the wolf and the problems surrounding the wolf to represent the issues that effect everyone in these areas in regards to Agenda 21 and the environmental groups. The wolf is an animal that is iconic with a deep history to the land so perhaps they are hoping that gets them more attention to the bigger picture.
Bigger picture = Water, land and mineral resources being taken away from the people of the states.





This is a clip from a panel of people that are actively fighting against things that environmental groups have been using to implement Agenda 21. It was called Defend Rural America.
In this video, Doyel Shamley explains how Apache County, Arizona regained control of its forests by challenging federal jurisdiction over so-called "public lands" and asserting the County's own jurisdiction. Everyone won - the forests, the endangered species, the community, the local economy, even juvenile offenders. This is his talk at the October 20, 2012 Defend Rural America™ launch in Lodi, California. Valuable information that is well worth watching.

There is another video on YT from the same conference that is a lil over 2 hours long and goes more in depth as to what they did, and what they fought and how in Apache County if anyone's interested.
"Listen to everyone, read everything, believe nothing unless you can prove it in your own research"
~William Cooper

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10-18-2013, 04:52 PM,
#8
RE: Wolves in Government Clothing (Documentary)
Nice info on the Apache county. I'm just wondering if their forestry management involves only outputs and no inputs. They're taking biomass out via the lumber mills but what are they putting back in? If nothing, the soil will be exhausted just like it is in standard agriculture, leading to ecosystem breakdown. Don't get me wrong, I'm not saying the Feds would do better, but Doyel keeps talking about the root cause and I don't think he's near it yet.
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10-18-2013, 05:11 PM,
#9
RE: Wolves in Government Clothing (Documentary)
(10-18-2013, 04:52 PM)fujiinn Wrote: Nice info on the Apache county. I'm just wondering if their forestry management involves only outputs and no inputs. They're taking biomass out via the lumber mills but what are they putting back in? If nothing, the soil will be exhausted just like it is in standard agriculture, leading to ecosystem breakdown. Don't get me wrong, I'm not saying the Feds would do better, but Doyel keeps talking about the root cause and I don't think he's near it yet.

Im not sure what you mean by "what are they putting back in?" If you can explain that better I could try to address it if I know anything specific to that.
I know that in regards to taking biomass out it was about cutting trees to thin the forests enough to prevent catastrophic wildfires. The Forest services had in their own plans to keep wildfires at a minimum, that it was necessary to keep the trees at about 100 per acre, however at the time of the biggest wildfire in US history, it was near 1000 trees per acre. This fed the fire and made it much worse then it had to be. Where the FEDs have no jurisdictional control (indian reservation land)- the fires died. Because the tribes were allowed to treat their forests as they saw fit.

For the most part the FEDs werent letting the counties manage their forests supposedly to protect the spotted owl- yet in essence, the forest service basically killed off nearly 85% of the spotted owl by not doing their job, and not allowing the peoples of the county to take care of the land themselves.
"Listen to everyone, read everything, believe nothing unless you can prove it in your own research"
~William Cooper

DTTNWO!
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10-18-2013, 07:03 PM,
#10
RE: Wolves in Government Clothing (Documentary)
(10-18-2013, 05:11 PM)SiLVa Wrote: Im not sure what you mean by "what are they putting back in?" If you can explain that better I could try to address it if I know anything specific to that.

I might have made a mistake. I had a classical forest exploitation in mind but that might not be the model that is being used in this case (I didn't see the 2hr video, only the beginning, but I assume it deals more with reasons regarding why to decentralize than principles of management). If all they're doing is taking out deadwood from the forest or harvesting trees every 20 to 30 years, that might not be a problem, but if they're doing it intensive (clearing a sector of forest at a time and planting saplings to replace the harvested mature trees), because that's more efficient from a commercial standpoint, it will lead to the same problems modern agriculture faces, for instance desertification. By inputs I mean organic and/or mineral matter in a form capable to sustain the life web of the soil. A good idea would be to use human excrement ,spent cooking oil, spoiled food, etc. in an aerobic composting process and to distribute the resulting product in the sections of the forest under active management to help kickstart new tree plantings. Compost would help to alleviate the soil hydration problem as well by moderating the water cycles in the soil: less water runoff (and soil erosion) during heavy rains, more water stored during drought.

(10-18-2013, 05:11 PM)SiLVa Wrote: I know that in regards to taking biomass out it was about cutting trees to thin the forests enough to prevent catastrophic wildfires.

The tree density is not the problem. It actually is a good thing since trees are water pumps and by providing shade they reduce water evaporation which in turn helps biological decay of deadwood.


My whole point is that commercial focused management will probably fail.

More on the solutions side: Taking the Tragedy Out of Wildfires with Permaculture Design including a 17' crap quality audio.
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10-18-2013, 08:32 PM,
#11
RE: Wolves in Government Clothing (Documentary)
I get what your saying. I do know that the local people are doing things to benefit the ecosystems that they depend on for their survival. Especially if livestock is involved. I dont actually live there so I wouldnt be the one to talk to about what they are specifically. Doyel is the one I'm sure would know since he is the Apache County Resource Coodinator. Its something I can ask about if you like.

You're correct in saying that trees help with holding water, but thats assuming all those trees are alive and not dried out or burnt deadwood. I was there in September, at the hight of monsoon seasons in Apache County and the water reservoirs were empty. None of the trees held the water because of the wild fire damages. So all the water was running off elsewhere instead of where it was normally, which is where its needed. Again- all this is a result of the fires that were out of control because the forests werent being maintained by the FEDs as they should have been.

Commercial management is not always the best and I'm not trying to advocate that as the solution. However I do think that the people of the area are capable of managing the resources in a way that is profitable for some commercial uses, as well as maintain benefits of public use and the overall health of the environment better than the FEDs have done.
"Listen to everyone, read everything, believe nothing unless you can prove it in your own research"
~William Cooper

DTTNWO!
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10-18-2013, 08:41 PM,
#12
RE: Wolves in Government Clothing (Documentary)
"Its something I can ask about if you like."

Sure, it would be great to find out how they've planned this. Transparency is always a good thing when dealing with public issues.
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