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BOLD: Berkman Online Lectures & Discussions - Learn: Privacy in Cyberspace
09-05-2013, 03:53 PM,
#1
BOLD: Berkman Online Lectures & Discussions - Learn: Privacy in Cyberspace
The Berkman Center for Internet & Society at Harvard Law School

Welcome to the archived Berkman Center for Internet & Society BOLD
site for "Privacy in Cyberspace" which was offered in the Spring of 2002.

Syllabus/Course Info


Informational Privacy concerns the claim to control the collection, use or distribution of information about oneself. This series is designed to address potential threats to individuals' informational privacy on the Web posed by collection, use and distribution of that information by other individuals, corporate or institutional interests, or by the government. We have designed the series so that it will be possible for a participant to gain an awareness of some of the legal and policy issues affecting privacy that arise online. The series launched March 11, 2002, and the live portion of the series ran for six weeks.

We have organized our study of privacy in cyberspace into six weeklong modules. Each module is designed to explore various technologies and to ask whether their use raises privacy questions.

Please note that participation in this series was asynchronous.

Students actively participated in the series in three ways:

(1) Studied the materials and contemplate the questions and hypotheticals in the Modules as they were launched.

(2) Participated actively by sending in a comment in response to each week's readings.

(3) Participated in the threaded discussions as they were launched, and throughout the course.

Module 1: Introduction
Module 2: Online Profiling
Module 3: Employees Privacy on the Net
Module 4: Governmental Collection of Data - Part I
Module 5: Governmental Collection of Data - Part II
Module 6: Cryptography and other Self-Help Mechanisms
One of the first duties of the physician is to educate the masses not to take medicine...
William Osler
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09-06-2013, 04:55 PM, (This post was last modified: 09-06-2013, 04:56 PM by temp9.)
#2
RE: BOLD: Berkman Online Lectures & Discussions - Learn: Privacy in Cyberspace
Thanks for posting this.

This is probably not the thread for my comment, but with the latest revelations from the Snowden documents (re: encryption), one has to wonder if there's any way at all to keep even the smallest amount of our online privacy.

I'm now using a VPN exclusively, for all internet access, if for no other reason than to annoy the treasonous, treacherous bastards at NSA - and elsewhere - who think they have some God-given right to snoop on every freaking thing in the universe.

I am beyond angry.
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09-06-2013, 06:35 PM,
#3
RE: BOLD: Berkman Online Lectures & Discussions - Learn: Privacy in Cyberspace
VPNs are probably better than nothing but if some 3 letter agency is interested in your traffic that's not going to stop them since most VPN providers and ISPs log traffic or would log if ordered to do so, regardless of jurisdiction.

Wardriving might give better results since it relies on public wifi's so as long as you cannot be identified by surveillance cameras or the device you're using (including software) you're probably safe.
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09-07-2013, 06:29 PM,
#4
RE: BOLD: Berkman Online Lectures & Discussions - Learn: Privacy in Cyberspace
(09-06-2013, 04:55 PM)temp9 Wrote: Thanks for posting this.

I'm now using a VPN exclusively, for all internet access, if for no other reason than to annoy the treasonous, treacherous bastards at NSA - and elsewhere - who think they have some God-given right to snoop on every freaking thing in the universe.

I am beyond angry.


As the amount of damage increases, the number of bad actors we wouldn't tolerate decreases.
And in theory you can imagine it gets to the point even one is bad, even one is too much. This is the weapon for mass destruction debate.
The terrorist can do so much freaking damage that we must rewrite all of our laws to make sure we catch them before they do there bad thing. No more after the fact detection response that works for murder and a lot of other crimes. There must be predictive policing there must be arresting people on conspiracy. All of these reasons why you have this invasive investigative tools.
Bruce Schneier & Jonathan Zittrain on IT, Security, and Power
One of the first duties of the physician is to educate the masses not to take medicine...
William Osler
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