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intel to set up lab in london for corporate version of ¨Perfect Citizen¨
05-26-2012, 10:48 PM,
#1
intel to set up lab in london for corporate version of ¨Perfect Citizen¨
Original URL: http://www.theregister.co.uk/2012/05/25/intel_research_institute_london/
London picked as test bed for Skynet-like Intel tech

New UK lab pledged to study citizens in real-time

By Brid-Aine Parnell

Posted in Business, 25th May 2012 10:45 GMT

London will be a guinea pig for future smart city technology after Intel pledged to spend a slice of £25m ($40m) on a new lab in the capital. The chipmaker will also plough millions into research centres dotted around Blighty.

Intel will set up the unwieldily monikered Collaborative Research Institute for Sustainable Connected Cities in the capital in partnership with Imperial College and University College London, it announced yesterday at an event at 10 Downing Street.

The company will spend the £25m over the next five years on all five of its Collaborative Research Institutes, but wouldn't give the breakdown of exactly how much London would be getting. ICL and UCL will also chip in some dosh, but again no figures were bandied about.

At the same event, Chipzilla said it will open a string of research centres around the UK, investing around £45m in an Intel Labs Europe UK R&D network: this will employ 350 researchers in labs including the one in London and others in Brighton, Swindon and Aylesbury to start with, and five more to be decided on by the end of the year.
george osbourne small

"It is investments like this that will help us put the UK on the path we need to take to create new jobs, new growth and new prosperity in every corner of our country," Chancellor George Osborne said at the launch.

"We are determined to make the UK the best place to do business in the world and a great place for technology companies to invest and build new business. It is encouraging to see major tech partners like Intel investing in this country as a result of the policies that the Government has put in place," he self-congratulated.

Intel will use the London lab to suss out smart city technology and it will also team up with Shoreditch's Tech City entrepreneurs to use their "social media expertise" to "identify and analyse emerging trends with cities".

"Using London as a testbed, researchers will explore technologies to make cities more aware by harnessing real-time user and city infrastructure data," the company said in a statement, describing similar Skynet-like smart city research elsewhere [1].

"For example, a sensor network could be used to monitor traffic flows and predict the effects of extreme weather conditions on water supplies, resulting in the delivery of near real-time information to citizens through citywide displays and mobile applications."
Justin Rattner

Rattner: City under pre-planned stress

Intel CTO Justin Rattner also said that the London Olympic games would give the firm a great opportunity to look at a city under pressure and figure out where the weak points are.

"London is, as everyone knows, the host city to the 2012 summer Olympic Games, and we plan to use the event to understand the experiences of a city under pre-planned stress. What systems worked or didn’t work and why? How were the daily lives of the citizens, workers, and businesses of London affected?" he wondered out loud.

As well as giving Intel the opportunity to see it mess up, London is also a good choice for the research institute as the fifth largest city in the world.

"It has the largest GDP in Europe, and with over 300 languages and 200 ethnic communities, its diversity is a microcosm of the planet itself, offering an exciting test bed to create and define sustainable cities," Rattner enthused. ®
Links

http://www.theregister.co.uk/2012/05/08/greenwich_peninsula_smart_city/

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05-27-2012, 11:07 AM,
#2
RE: intel to set up lab in london for corporate version of ¨Perfect Citizen¨
Perfect Citizen .. argh. More on this topic, ConCen style - reverse chronological, yes it's all connected:

Tom Burghardt's take on Perfect Citizen - read the links, too.
http://concen.org/forum/showthread.php?tid=33941

Facebook moves closer to a virtual currency system that pays workers <$1/day
http://concen.org/forum/showthread.php?tid=33890

Jesse Schell - DICE 2010: Design Outside the Box - Disturbing Presentation on Gaming Psychology, Technology, Social Engineering and Marketing
http://concen.org/tracker/torrents-details.php?id=18423

NSA Creating Spy System to Monitor Domestic Infrastructure
http://concen.org/forum/showthread.php?tid=33834

Pentagon's Cyber Command: Civilian Infrastructure a "Legitimate" Target

Dangerous Cybercrime Treaty Pushes Surveillance and Secrecy Worldwide
http://concen.org/forum/showthread.php?tid=42363

Cyberwar, the Internet and the Militarization of Civil Society
http://concen.org/forum/showthread.php?tid=32713

Obama Demands Access to Internet Records, in Secret, and Without Court Review
http://concen.org/forum/showthread.php?tid=34622

Mininova, Torrent-finder, Bite the Dust. ISOhunt, Demonoid and TPB under Fire
http://concen.org/forum/showthread.php?tid=30496

Currency/Warfare:¨A new world order will emerge from the ashes.¨
http://concen.org/forum/showthread.php?tid=44448
There are no others, there is only us.
http://FastTadpole.com/
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05-27-2012, 09:24 PM, (This post was last modified: 05-27-2012, 10:05 PM by h3rm35.)
#3
RE: intel to set up lab in london for corporate version of ¨Perfect Citizen¨
that´s not all, folks, now the good old US of A State department is gifting both Mexico and Israeli firm Verint with a massive contract to set up fusion centers south of the fucking border... don´t we have enough problems here without giving away our money to foreign interests?

Look out Canada, you´re next.

Quote:Why Is the State Department 'Arming' Mexico's Intelligence Agencies with Advanced Intercept Technologies?

Amid recent reports that the bodies of four Mexican journalists were discovered in a canal in the port city of Veracruz, less than a week after another journalist based in that city was found strangled in her home, the U.S. State Department "plans to award a contract to provide a Mexican government security agency with a system that can intercept and analyze information from all types of communications systems," NextGov reported.

The most glaring and obvious question is: why?

Since President Felipe Calderón declared "war" against some of the region's murderous drug cartels in 2006, some 50,000 Mexicans have been butchered. Activists, journalists, honest law enforcement officials but also ordinary citizens caught in the crossfire, the vast majority of victims, have been the targets of mafia-controlled death squads, corrupt police and the military.

Underscoring the savage nature of another "just war" funded by U.S. taxpayers, last week The Dallas Morning News reported that "23 people were found dead Friday--nine hanging from a bridge and 14 decapitated--across the Texas border in the city of Nuevo Laredo."

The arcane and highly-ritualized character of the violence, often accompanied by sardonic touches meant to instill fear amongst people already ground underfoot by crushing poverty and official corruption that would make the Borgias blush, convey an unmistakable message: "We rule here!"

"The latest massacres are part of a continuing battle between the paramilitary group known as the Zetas and the Sinaloa cartel," the Morning News averred. "The violence appears to be part of a strategy by the Sinaloa cartel to disrupt one of the most lucrative routes for drug smugglers by bringing increased attention from the federal government."

According to investigators the "two warring cartels are fighting for control of the corridor that leads into Interstate 35, known as one of the most lucrative routes for smugglers."

But as Laura Carlsen, the director of the Americas Program pointed out last month in CounterPunch, "In a series of 'Joint Operations' between Federal Police and Armed Forces, the Mexican government has deployed more than 45,000 troops into various regions of the country in an unprecedented domestic low-intensity conflict."

The militarization of Mexican society, as in the "Colossus to the North," has also seen the expansion of a bloated Surveillance State. Carlsen averred that when the Army and Federal Police are "deployed to communities where civilians are defined as suspected enemies, soldiers and officers have responded too often with arbitrary arrests, personal agendas and corruption, extrajudicial executions, the use of torture, and excessive use of force."

But expanding the surveillance capabilities of secret state agencies as the State Department proposes in its multimillion dollar gift to the Israeli-founded firm, Verint Systems, far from inhibiting violence by drug gangs and the security apparatus, on the contrary, will only rationalize repression as new "targets" are identified and electronic communications are data-mined for "actionable intelligence."

Indeed, The New York Times reported last summer that "after months of negotiations, the United States established an intelligence post on a northern Mexican military base."

Although anonymous "American officials" cited by the Times "declined to provide details about the work being done" by a team of spooks drawn from the Drug Enforcement Administration, the CIA and "retired military personnel members from the Pentagon's Northern Command," they said that "the compound had been modeled after 'fusion intelligence centers' that the United States operates in Iraq and Afghanistan to monitor insurgent groups."

Such developments are hardly encouraging considering the role played by "fusion centers" here in the heimat. As the ACLU has amply documented, "Americans have been put under surveillance or harassed by the police just for deciding to organize, march, protest, espouse unusual viewpoints, and engage in normal, innocuous behaviors such as writing notes or taking photographs in public."

In Mexico, the results will be immeasurably worse; with corruption endemic on both sides of the border, who's to say authorities won't sell personal data gleaned from these digital sweeps to the highest bidder? ...

Quote:...
Drugs, Terror, War... Whatever

Like the "War on Terror," the "War on Drugs" is predicated on the fallacy that "persistent situational awareness" obtained through the driftnet surveillance of electronic communications will give secret state agencies a leg-up on their adversaries.

Better think again! As Villar and Cottle pointed out, "the 1994 discovery of a computer owned by members of the Cali cartel offered clues on the complexities of the system and illustrated the technological sophistication of Colombia's narco-economy."

Indeed, the $1.5 million IBM AS400 mainframe "networked with half a dozen terminals and monitors and six technicians overseeing its operations," and its "custom-written data-mining software cross-referenced the Cali phone exchange's traffic with the phone numbers of American personnel and Colombian intelligence and law enforcement officials."

That network was "set up by a retired Colombian army intelligence officer," a fact which the Colombian government denied despite strong evidence to the contrary. And when Colombian officials "established a toll-free hotline for information about the Cali cartel leaders," Villar and Cottle reported that a "former high-level DEA official said: 'All of these anonymous callers were immediately identified, and they were killed."

By today's standards, that IBM mainframe is a throwback to the stone age. With advanced communications and encryption technologies readily available to anyone, and with any number of dodgy spy firms specializing in everything from the mass harvesting of information from social networks to the installation of malware on personal computers and GPS smartphone tracking as the WikiLeaks Spyfiles revealed, only a fool--or a State Department bureaucrat--would believe that weaponized spy kit won't fall into the hands of billion dollar organized crime groups. Yet that's exactly what Washington plans to do.

In the NextGov report cited above, we were informed that the State Department's "Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs, in a contract notice published late Friday, said it will fund what it called the Mexico Technical Surveillance System for use by that country's Public Security Secretariat to 'continue to help deter, prevent and mitigate acts of major federal crimes in Mexico that include narcotics trafficking and terrorism'."

The contract proposal specifies that "all awards will be based on the following criteria in order of importance for 1) Technical Approach/Understanding/Personnel, 2) Corporate Experience, 3) Past Performance and 4) Price. Technical merit (captured in the three (3) technical evaluation factors enumerated above, taken together) is significantly more important than cost/price."

But as NextGov reported while the procurement, at least on paper, is "competitive," the State Department "came close to ruling out any other bidder except Verint with the caveat that 'the new equipment must function seamlessly with the existing in a single system or be entirely replaced'."

That pretty much "levels the playing field" for the Israeli firm and the suite of surveillance tools it offers, the Reliant Monitoring System, which "intercepts virtually any wired, wireless or broadband communication network and service." Indeed, the State Department plans to "triple the capacity of the current Verint system from 30 workstations to 107," according to NextGov. Given the spooky nature of the company, no doubt El Chapo is drooling over the prospect.

As James Bamford pointed out in The Shadow Factory and in a series of recent articles in Wired Magazine, "Verint was founded in Israel by Israelis, including Jacob 'Kobi' Alexander, a former Israeli intelligence officer. Some 800 employees work for Verint, including 350 who are based in Israel, primarily working in research and development and operations."

As Antifascist Calling disclosed back in 2008 (see: "Thick as Thieves: The Private (and very profitable) World of Corporate Spying"): "When Comverse Infosys [now Verint] founder and CEO Jacob 'Kobi' Alexander fled to Israel and later Namibia in 2006, the former Israeli intelligence officer and entrepreneur took along a little extra cash for his extended 'vacation'--$57 million to be precise."

Alexander, a veteran of Israel's ultra-secretive Unit 8200, the equivalent of America's National Security Agency, fled to Namibia because he faced a 32-count indictment by the Justice Department over allegations that he masterminded a scheme to backdate millions of Comverse stock options which allowed the enterprising corporate grifter to embezzle some $138 million from company shareholders.

As I wrote back then, "despite alarms raised by a score of federal law enforcement agencies, including the Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA), fearful that sensitive wiretap information was finding its way into the hands of international narcotrafficking cartels, virtually nothing has been done to halt the outsourcing of America's surveillance apparatus to firms with intimate ties to foreign intelligence entities. Indeed, as America's spy system is turned inward against the American people, corporations such as Verint work hand-in-glove with a spooky network of security agencies and their corporatist pals in the telecommunications industry."

But as we know, software and the spy trojans embedded in their code are "neutral." What can be used by law enforcement agencies such as Mexico's Secretaría de Seguridad Pública (SSP) and the Agencia Federal de Investigación (AFI) can also be handed over by corrupt officials to their presumed targets, the Sinaloa, Gulf, Juárez, Knights Templar, Tijuana or Los Zetas narcotrafficking cartels, all of whom have ties to Mexico's narco-bourgeoisie, police and the military.

It wouldn't be the first time that "retired" Israeli military officers or "ex" Mossad men were exposed as trainers for some of the drug world's most notorious killers...

the rest of the article is here, and is well worth reading in its entirety, as is almost everything else by Burghardt.


PS - on the Canadian note, looks like they´re on the brink of setting up their own infrastructure for similar stuff:

¨The FBI was rather public with its recent demands for backdoor access to websites and Internet services across the board, but as the agency awaits those secret surveillance powers, they’re working on their own end to have those e-spy capabilities.

Not much has been revealed about one of the Federal Bureau of Investigation’s newest projects, the Domestic Communications Assistance Center, and the FBI will probably try to keep it that way. Despite attempting to keep the DCAC largely under wraps, an investigation spearheaded by Cnet’s Declan McCullagh is quickly collecting details about the agency’s latest endeavor...

...Following McCullagh’s expose, the FBI reached out to the reporter and, in not as few words, all but confirmed his fears.

“[T]he NDCAC will have the functionality to leverage the research and development efforts of federal, state, and local law enforcement with respect to electronic surveillance capabilities and facilitate the sharing of technology among law enforcement agencies. Technical personnel from other federal, state, and local law enforcement agencies will be able to obtain advice and guidance if they have difficulty in attempting to implement lawful electronic surveillance court orders,” reads the FBI’s statement.

In an attempt to sugarcoat the DCAC, the spokesperson pleads with McCullogh, “It is important to point out that the NDCAC will not be responsible for the actual execution of any electronic surveillance court orders and will not have any direct operational or investigative role in investigations. It will provide the technical knowledge and referrals in response to law enforcement’s requests for technical assistance.”

The FBI, they say, won’t pull the trigger themselves. They claim they’ll just build the gun and the bullets and set their sights on the World Wide Web.

A similar legislation north of the border, the C-30 surveillance bill, will allow Canadian authorities similar powers, if passed.¨

rest of that piece can be found:
http://concen.org/forum/showthread.php?tid=45883
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