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Awesome statement From piratebay re SOPA & PIPA
01-19-2012, 08:01 AM,
#1
Awesome statement From piratebay re SOPA & PIPA
I just ran across this on another forum, it's a must read. Sofaking awesome too if the part about edison and hollywood is true. Bunch of thieves bitching that the content they stole, was stolen by someone else, in short.

Quote:INTERNETS, 18th of January 2012.
PRESS RELEASE, FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE.

Over a century ago Thomas Edison got the patent for a device which would "do for the eye what the phonograph does for
the ear". He called it the Kinetoscope. He was not only amongst the first to record video, he was also the first person
to own the copyright to a motion picture.

Because of Edisons patents for the motion pictures it was close to financially impossible to create motion pictures
in the North american east coast. The movie studios therefor relocated to California, and founded what we today call
Hollywood. The reason was mostly because there was no patent.
There was also no copyright to speak of, so the studios could copy old stories and make movies out of them - like
Fantasia, one of Disneys biggest hits ever.

So, the whole basis of this industry, that today is screaming about losing control over immaterial rights, is that they
circumvented immaterial rights. They copied (or put in their terminology: "stole") other peoples creative works,
without paying for it. They did it in order to make a huge profit. Today, they're all successful and most of the
studios are on the Fortune 500 list of the richest companies in the world. Congratulations - it's all based on being
able to re-use other peoples creative works. And today they hold the rights to what other people create.
If you want to get something released, you have to abide to their rules. The ones they created after circumventing
other peoples rules.

The reason they are always complainting about "pirates" today is simple. We've done what they did. We circumvented the
rules they created and created our own. We crushed their monopoly by giving people something more efficient. We allow
people to have direct communication between eachother, circumventing the profitable middle man, that in some cases take
over 107% of the profits (yes, you pay to work for them).
It's all based on the fact that we're competition.
We've proven that their existance in their current form is no longer needed. We're just better than they are.

And the funny part is that our rules are very similar to the founding ideas of the USA. We fight for freedom of speech.
We see all people as equal. We believe that the public, not the elite, should rule the nation. We believe that laws
should be created to serve the public, not the rich corporations.

The Pirate Bay is truly an international community. The team is spread all over the globe - but we've stayed out of the
USA. We have Swedish roots and a swedish friend said this:
The word SOPA means "trash" in Swedish. The word PIPA means "a pipe" in Swedish. This is of course not a coincidence.
They want to make the internet inte a one way pipe, with them at the top, shoving trash through the pipe down to the
rest of us obedient consumers.
The public opinion on this matter is clear. Ask anyone on the street and you'll learn that noone wants to be fed with
trash. Why the US government want the american people to be fed with trash is beyond our imagination but we hope that
you will stop them, before we all drown.

SOPA can't do anything to stop TPB. Worst case we'll change top level domain from our current .org to one of the
hundreds of other names that we already also use. In countries where TPB is blocked, China and Saudi Arabia springs to
mind, they block hundreds of our domain names. And did it work? Not really.
To fix the "problem of piracy" one should go to the source of the problem. The entertainment industry say they're
creating "culture" but what they really do is stuff like selling overpriced plushy dolls and making 11 year old girls
become anorexic. Either from working in the factories that creates the dolls for basically no salary or by watching
movies and tv shows that make them think that they're fat.

In the great Sid Meiers computer game Civilization you can build Wonders of the world. One of the most powerful ones
is Hollywood. With that you control all culture and media in the world. Rupert Murdoch was happy with MySpace and had
no problems with their own piracy until it failed. Now he's complainting that Google is the biggest source of piracy
in the world - because he's jealous. He wants to retain his mind control over people and clearly you'd get a more
honest view of things on Wikipedia and Google than on Fox News.

Some facts (years, dates) are probably wrong in this press release. The reason is that we can't access this information
when Wikipedia is blacked out. Because of pressure from our failing competitors. We're sorry for that.

THE PIRATE BAY, (K)2012

https://static.thepiratebay.org/legal/sopa.txt. LOL
Reply
01-19-2012, 09:47 AM, (This post was last modified: 01-19-2012, 09:55 AM by nwo2012.)
#2
RE: Awesome statement From piratebay re SOPA & PIPA
Excellent. I know they toned it down to be a little more PC. I believe there is more to the Edison story and involved powerful Jews.

Quote:How The Jews Stole Thomas Edison's Motion Picture Invention

Thomas Edison was the greatest inventor who ever lived with over 2,000 inventions patented including the electric light, the phonograph and the motion picture machine.

In 1903 the four Warner brothers bought a used Edison Kinetoscope projector for $1,000 and repaired it. They began showing what they called the "magic lantern pictures" on the walls in beer halls. 1909 Edison's General Film Co. sued Warner Brothers for violating their copyright to the motion picture machine and forced them to close their company. At that time, the Warners and other Jews were making illegal films in Brooklyn. They fled Edison's private detectives for Los Angeles where lax laws let them steal the film business away from Thomas Edison.

Later this same skullduggery occurred once again. Two Christian inventors. Lee De Forrest and Theodore Case, came up with the "talking machine" sound system. The same Jewish producers also stole this invention and the Jew Al Jolson came out with the first "talkie" film - "The Jazz Singer."

Quote:An Empire of Their Own - How The Jews Invented Hollywood" is a book by Neal Cabler available from your bookstore. Gabler tells the story of a group of Jewish refugees who fled Russia when it was under the Christian Czars because they banned such "Jewish business practices" as moneylending at usurious interest rates.

These "persecuted" Russian Jews included Marcus Loew who founded Loews Pictures, Louis B. Mayer and Samuel Goldwyn started Metro-Goldwyn Mayer (MGM). Barney Balaban launched Paramount and Harry Cohen formed Columbia Pictures. William Fox started Twentieth Century Fox. The four Jewish brothers, Jack, Samuel, Albert and Harry Warner who departed Poland only six years earlier formed Warner Brothers.

http://www.iamthewitness.com/doc/Jewish.Stars.Over.Hollywood.htm#HowTheJewsStoleThomasEdisonsMotionPictureInvention
Reply
01-19-2012, 05:00 PM,
#3
RE: Awesome statement From piratebay re SOPA & PIPA
Edison was a thief and monopolist. He invented hardly anything. He controlled the patent office and used it to steal other's ideas.

I'm no fan of the filth who created Hollywood, but Edison was an asshole when it came to films. He wouldn't allow anyone to make films unless they paid him an outrageous fee for every copy.

Does it make sense for someone to be allowed to charge photographers for every photograph they took? Does it make sense for someone to be allowed to charge for every book printed on a patented printing press, or document typed on a patented typewriter?
[Image: randquote.png]
Reply
01-19-2012, 07:24 PM, (This post was last modified: 01-19-2012, 07:33 PM by h3rm35.)
#4
RE: Awesome statement From piratebay re SOPA & PIPA
still love edison´s footage of him electrocuting an elephant featured in the film ¨Land of the Blind¨ while he was fighting to secure his angle in the AC vs. DC debate... Now that was an original film. A perfect example of how edison was a complete jackass. Can you imagine what the world would be like if Tesla ended up with notoriety he deserved?

btw, LOTB is one of my favorite films of all time... to show my support for TPB, here´s a link to it:
https://thepiratebay.org/torrent/5707273/Land.Of.The.Blind.2006.DVDRip.x264-SHiTTy
great flick that barely anyone´s ever seen - worth your time, I promise.

[Image: highres_86964712.jpeg]
Quote:That's a photo of some of the 2,500 real live human beings who showed up outside of New York Senator Chuck Schumer's office yesterday to protest censorship. (They closed down half of Third Avenue.)

[Image: conspiracy_theory.jpg]
Reply
01-19-2012, 08:17 PM,
#5
RE: Awesome statement From piratebay re SOPA & PIPA
(01-19-2012, 07:24 PM)h3rm35 Wrote: ¨Land of the Blind¨ ... Now that was an original film.

According to Celtic Rebel, that makes you a flaming felching fudge packing trouser pilot.

[Image: randquote.png]
Reply
01-19-2012, 08:58 PM, (This post was last modified: 01-19-2012, 09:40 PM by h3rm35.)
#6
RE: Awesome statement From piratebay re SOPA & PIPA
celtic rebel can suck my cock (after all, nothing´s better than a big, juicy steak, right?) and kiss my ass...
anyway,

Copyright Lawyers Oppose SOPA … And Say It Won’t Even Work

Quote:SOPA Won’t Work

Many experts have said that the Stop Online Privacy Act (SOPA) and Protect IP Act (PIPA) are not only draconian, but that they fail to address the root problem.

A former intellectual property law school professor points out:

[SOPA and PIPA] aim to curb online copyright piracy … but end up using a sledgehammer, when a fine scalpel is instead needed.

***

As reported by Forbes, the Atlantic Monthly and others, coders are already developing work-arounds to SOPA and PIPA. For example, a developer using the alias “Tamer Rizk” launched DeSopa, an add-on for the popular Firefox browser that would allow users to visit sites blocked by the proposed copyright protection measures proposed under SOPA. So not only these bills are not only draconian, but they won’t work.

Jay McDaniel – a plaintiff’s attorney for content providers fighting torrent–based copyright infringement – agrees, and proposes a better alternative:

There is a simple solution to the dilemma of digital piracy, however, one that will cost the government nothing, that will protect free speech and that will ultimately bring an end to a practice that is undermining the viability of our cultural industries. More importantly, it will enable Congress to avoid polluting legitimate free speech issues with behavior that is neither protected by the Constitution nor lawful.

Simply let copyright holders exercise the right to efficiently discover the identity of infringers. Copyright law as it presently exists with its substantial civil remedies will take care of the rest of the problem.

***

The answer is simple. Congress should overrule two decisions that held that copyright owners could not use the Digital Millenium Copyright Act (DMCA) to subpoena the identities of infringers directly from cable internet service providers. These two decisions, Recording Indus. Ass’n of America v. Verizon Internet Servs., Inc., 351 F.3d 1299 (D.C. Cir. 2003) and In re Charter Communications, Inc., 393 F.3d 771 (8th Cir. 2005), have made it extremely difficult for copyright owners to find and prosecute civil claims against the wide-spread piracy that occurs on peer-to-peer networks.

Both cases involved attempts by copyright owners to use a provision in the DMCA that allows the owners to issue takedown notices to Internet Service Providers (ISPs) and to also obtain a subpoena to learn the identity of the infringer. The Verizon and Charter Communications courts held that the takedown notice-subpoena provisions did not apply to claims seeking to discover the identity of Internet account holders.

It was a strained reading of the statute to begin with, and it has led to a morass of litigation and discovery disputes in which there are conflicting jurisdictional and venue decisions on a nearly daily basis. More significantly these decisions closed the courthouse doors to any copyright holder that cannot demonstrate widespread copying sufficient to justify bringing a large “John Doe” action just to find out who the culprits are. Moreover, in a relatively small number of cases, hostile district judges are unwilling to let the cases go forward in any reasonably economic manner.

***

Copyright holders know that their works are being pirated. They know where they are being pirated and how they are being pirated. But they simply cannot get to the pirates. If Congress were to overrule these decisions, the problem would disappear as the people who break the law would find themselves facing the serious consequences of a civil infringement suit. The infringers would pay for the remedy through statutory fee shifting.

Private enforcement litigation would replace the need for government oversight of our Internet habits, and those who break the law would fund the system. Digital piracy, in its present form, would quickly come to a halt for the same reason that we don’t shoplift copies of DVDs from Walmart. It’s too easy to get caught and the penalties are too severe.

Obviously, the law should be crafted so that discovery can only be used against actual copyright pirates, not political commentators or bloggers who – under the fair use and My Lai/Zapruder exceptions to copyright law – use portions of copyrighted material for political or social commentary, or for educational purposes. In other words, copyright law should never be used to crush dissent. (We understand that some – like Amir Taaki – promote the destruction of all copyright laws. We don’t agree with that view.)
Many Copyright Lawyers Oppose SOPA

Indeed, many of the nation’s top copyright lawyers oppose SOPA and PIPA, including:

Marvin Ammori, Affiliate Scholar, Center for Internet & Society, Stanford Law School
Brook K. Baker, Northeastern University School of Law
Stewart Baker, former NSA General Counsel and Head of Cyber Policy for DHS
Derek E. Bambauer, Brooklyn Law School
Margreth Barrett, Hastings College of Law University of California-San Francisco
Mark Bartholomew, University at Buffalo Law School
Ann M. Bartow, Pace Law School
Marsha Baum, University of New Mexico School of Law
Yochai Benkler, Harvard Law School
Oren Bracha, University of Texas School of Law
Annemarie Bridy, University of Idaho College of Law
Chris Bronk, Rice University
Dan L. Burk, University of California-Irvine School of Law
Irene Calboli, Marquette University School of Law
Adam Candeub, Michigan State University College of Law
Michael Carrier, Rutgers Law School – Camden
Michael W. Carroll, Washington College of Law American University
Brian W. Carver, School of Information University of California-Berkeley
Anupam Chander, University of California-Davis School of Law
Andrew Chin, University of North Carolina School of Law
Ralph D. Clifford, University of Massachusetts School of Law
Julie E. Cohen, Georgetown University Law Center
G. Marcus Cole, Stanford Law School
Kevin Collins, Washington University-St. Louis School of Law
Danielle M. Conway, University of Hawai’i Richardson School of Law
Dennis S. Corgill, St. Thomas University School of Law
Christopher A. Cotropia, University of Richmond School of Law
Thomas Cotter, University of Minnesota School of Law
Julie Cromer Young, Thomas Jefferson School of Law
Ben Depoorter, Hastings College of Law University of California – San Francisco
Eric B. Easton, University of Baltimore School of Law
Anthony Falzone Director, Fair Use Project Stanford Law School
Nita Farahany, Vanderbilt Law School
Thomas G. Field, Jr., University of New Hampshire School of Law
Sean Flynn, Washington College of Law American University
Brett M. Frischmann, Cardozo Law School Yeshiva University
Jeanne C. Fromer, Fordham Law School
William T. Gallagher, Golden Gate University School of Law
Laura N. Gasaway, University of North Carolina School of Law
Deborah Gerhardt, University of North Carolina School of Law
Llew Gibbons, University of Toledo College of Law
Eric Goldman, Santa Clara University School of Law
Marc Greenberg, Golden Gate University School of Law
James Grimmelman, New York Law School
Leah Chan Grinvald, St. Louis University School of Law
Richard Gruner, John Marshall Law School
Robert A. Heverly, Albany Law School Union University
Laura A. Heymann, Marshall-Wythe School of Law College of William & Mary
Herbert Hovenkamp, University of Iowa College of Law
Dan Hunter, New York Law School
David R. Johnson, New York Law School
Faye E. Jones, Florida State University College of Law
Amy Kapczynski, University of California-Berkeley Law School
Dennis S. Karjala, Arizona State University College of Law
Anne Klinefelter, University of North Carolina College of Law
Mary LaFrance, William Boyd Law School University of Nevada – Las Vegas
Amy L. Landers, McGeorge Law School University of the Pacific
Mark Lemley, Stanford Law School
Lawrence Lessig, Harvard Law School
David S. Levine, Elon University School of Law
Yvette Joy Liebesman, St. Louis University School of Law
Peter Linzer, University of Houston Law Center
Lydia Pallas Loren, Lewis & Clark Law School
Michael J. Madison, University of Pittsburgh School of Law
Gregory P. Magarian, Washington University-St. Louis School of Law
Phil Malone, Harvard Law School
Christian E. Mammen, Hastings College of Law University of California-San Francisco
Jonathan Masur, University of Chicago Law School
Andrea Matwyshyn, Wharton School of Business University of Pennsylvania
J. Thomas McCarthy, University of San Francisco School of Law
Aleecia M. McDonald, Stanford University
William McGeveran, University of Minnesota Law School
Stephen McJohn, Suffolk University Law School
Mark P. McKenna, Notre Dame Law School
Hiram Melendez-Juarbe, University of Puerto Rico School of Law
Viva Moffat, University of Denver College of Law
Ira Nathenson, St. Thomas University School of Law
Tyler T. Ochoa, Santa Clara University School of Law
David S. Olson, Boston College Law School
Barak Y. Orbach, University of Arizona College of Law
Kristen Osenga, University of Richmond School of Law
Frank Pasquale, Seton Hall Law School
Aaron Perzanowski, Wayne State University Law School
Malla Pollack Co-author, Callman on Trademarks, Unfair Competition, and Monopolies
David G. Post, Temple University School of Law
Connie Davis Powell, Baylor University School of Law
Margaret Jane Radin, University of Michigan Law School
Glenn Reynolds, University of Tennessee Law School
David A. Rice, Roger Williams University School of Law
Neil Richards, Washington University-St. Louis School of Law
Michael Risch, Villanova Law School
Betsy Rosenblatt, Whittier Law School
Matthew Sag, Loyola University-Chicago School of Law
Pamela Samuelson, University of California-Berkeley Law School
Sharon K. Sandeen, Hamline University School of Law
Jason M. Schultz, UC Berkeley Law School
Jeremy Sheff, St. John’s University School of Law
Jessica Silbey, Suffolk University Law School
Brenda M. Simon, Thomas Jefferson School of Law
David E. Sorkin, John Marshall Law School
Christopher Jon Sprigman, University of Virginia School of Law
Katherine J. Strandburg, NYU Law School
Madhavi Sunder, University of California-Davis School of Law
Rebecca Tushnet, Georgetown University Law Center
Deborah Tussey, Oklahoma City University School of Law
Barbara van Schewick, Stanford Law School
Eugene Volokh, UCLA School of Law
Sarah K. Wiant, William & Mary Law School
Darryl C. Wilson, Stetson University College of Law
Jane K. Winn, University of Washington School of Law
Peter K. Yu, Drake University Law School
Tim Zick, William & Mary Law

For further background on the internet copyright bills, see:

The Tide Is Turning Against SOPA … And We Might Actually Succeed In Stopping It

SOPA Is “Unconstitutional”, Would “Criminalize” the Internet … Modeled On China

Job Creators, Internet Architects and Security Experts Hate SOPA

Sopa Would DESTROY Jobs and the Economy … So Why are Unions Supporting It?

Hypocrite Alert: SOPA Supporters Encouraged People to Use File-Sharing Software for Pirating Copyrighted Material

&

Quote:The Register®

Original URL: http://www.theregister.co.uk/2012/01/19/sopa_is_gone_are_you_happy_now/
SOPA is dead. Are you happy now?

It was a bad bill, but world needs IP incentive to keep producing

By Matt Asay

Posted in Law, 19th January 2012 16:02 GMT

Open ... and Shut In response to internet technology companies leading a rousing protest against SOPA and PIPA, these bills appear to be doomed to ignominious defeat. Even the co-sponsors of these anti-piracy bills are deserting their legislation [1], leaving the tech world to cheer its success [2].

But what kind of success did we achieve?

As written, the SOPA and PIPA were bad bills. They deserved criticism and lots of second thoughts. Through protests led by Wikipedia, Google, and others, the anti-SOPA/PIPA crowd managed to get the ear of Congress [3] and, to a lesser degree, the general public, and shout down bad legislation.

And that's the problem, actually. The shouting.

Former Mozilla CEO John Lilly captured [4] this best, arguing, "What’s extremely discouraging to me right now is that I don’t really see how we [the tech world and the US Congress] can have a nuanced, technically-informed, respectful discussion/debate/conversation/working relationship."

Instead all we get is the media industries engaging in back room lobbying to get bad bills passed while the tech world shotguns abuse until Congress capitulates. Talk about a dysfunctional relationship.

Part of the problem, as Lilly captures in a follow-up post [5], is that the tech world is largely reactionary. It really wasn't until Microsoft came before the US Justice Department for antitrust abuses that the tech world woke up to the fact that it was subject to anything other than the free market. Since then companies like Oracle and Google have set up increasingly substantial lobbying arms in Washington DC, but this isn't really the answer.

The tech world needs to find better ways to educate government than replicating the covert lobbying used against it or the megaphone protests we've seen with SOPA and PIPA.

Some things that feel obvious to many techies simply aren't outside Silicon Valley. Hence, Steve Blank can write [6] that "SOPA is a symbol of the movie industry's failure to innovate," chuckling that these "old world" industries simply "don't get it". But in so doing he overlooks the very real concerns such industries have about protecting their content, as pointed out by The Wall Street Journal [7]. We can blithely proclaim that digitisation obviates copyright, but the truth isn't nearly so black and white.

Even an open-source revolutionary like Marc Fleury groks this [8], writing in support of SOPA:

Increasingly the western world relies on IP to make a living. Since we produce less "real world" goods and more "digital world" goods we open ourselves to piracy. If we are to move to an information based economy there needs to be a limit to the infringement of IP.

You or I may disagree, but it would be useful if we were to do so through thoughtful conversation, rather than 140-character bursts of indignation, self-censorship of websites, etc.

Because, as The Register's Andrew Orlowski opines, in a must read article, "While the legislation is now moribund, the underlying concerns behind SOPA haven't gone away" and "SOPA will return next year, and the year after, until the issues have been tackled head on." Victory isn't victory when a bill is killed simply because it's been shouted down, but rather when there is a meeting of the minds over the essential facts around a problem, and real solutions are broached and agreed upon.

It's a discussion we need to have out in the open, without all the name-calling and sloganeering. Ironically, this sort of nuanced communication would likely encourage the rest of the tech industry – the Ciscos and IBMs and Oracles of the world – to join the conversation. To date, they've largely stayed on the sidelines [9], as they have interests on both sides of the debate.

We all do, in fact. Many of us simply don't recognise it yet, and won't until the essence of our businesses are threatened. This isn't to suggest that government should prop up dying industries. I'm all for creative destruction. But we shouldn't be blasé about the issues, assuming the people on the other side of the discussion are mindless idiots wedded to an antiquated business model.

SOPA is bad legislation. But the "discussion" around SOPA is worse, and points to a gap between the internet world and governments, one that we should be seeking to bridge, not deepen. ®

Matt Asay is senior vice president of business development at Nodeable, offering systems management for managing and analysing cloud-based data. He was formerly SVP of biz dev at HTML5 start-up Strobe and chief operating officer of Ubuntu commercial operation Canonical. With more than a decade spent in open source, Asay served as Alfresco's general manager for the Americas and vice president of business development, and he helped put Novell on its open source track. Asay is an emeritus board member of the Open Source Initiative (OSI). His column, Open...and Shut, appears three times a week on The Register.
Links

http://www.theregister.co.uk/2012/01/18/protectip_senator_sponsors_abandon_bill/
http://yro.slashdot.org/story/12/01/16/1457237/house-kills-sopa
http://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2012/01/the-sopa-blackout-created-a-big-problem/251578/
http://john.jubjubs.net/2012/01/06/whats-bothering-me-about-the-sopa-discussion/
http://john.jubjubs.net/2012/01/09/some-followup-thoughts-on-my-sopa-post/
http://www.theatlantic.com/business/archive/2012/01/sopa-is-a-symbol-of-the-movie-industrys-failure-to-innovate/250967/
http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052970203471004577142893718069820.html
http://www.thedelphicfuture.org/2012/01/why-i-support-sopa.html
http://www.internetnews.com/blog/skerner/who-isnt-talking-about-sopa.html



[Image: conspiracy_theory.jpg]
Reply
01-19-2012, 10:29 PM,
#7
RE: Awesome statement From piratebay re SOPA & PIPA
Nwo2012, thanks for the brief history lesson on the film industry. The more history I learn, the more I hate Jews. Of course, my mother and father moving our slightly Christian more spiritual family into a upper class Jewish majority neighborhood when I was five doesnt help my view towards them. I was always picked on by them.

Just have to keep reminding myself to not judge them all based on the actions of the others.

Yeti and h3rm35, the more I learn of Edison, the more I dislike him.....and the US "education" system. I don't seem to recall any of my "teachers" ever mentioning nikola tesla, once. They had plenty of credit to give Edison though. Even as I type on the iPad, Edison is automatically capitalized, where nikola tesla is not.


Reply
01-22-2012, 06:58 AM,
#8
RE: Awesome statement From piratebay re SOPA & PIPA
From http://maddox.xmission.com/ (excerpted only):
Quote:My problem with this huge online protest against SOPA, and the reason I rarely take part in such protests, is because it doesn't address any problems, only the symptom. The problem isn't this shitty bill, it's the people who sponsored it. So we protest this bill today, bang enough pots and pans to shame a few backers into not letting this bill pass, then what? Those same dipshits who wrote this legislation still have jobs. They're going to try again, and again, and again until some mutation of this legislation passes. They'll sneak it into an appropriation bill while nobody's looking during recess, because there's too much lobbyist money at stake for them not to. We defeat SOPA today, only to face it again tomorrow. It's like trying to stop a cold by blowing your nose. It's time we go after the virus.

The full page is worth a read or two.
Truth appears in many forms. Find those that resonate with you.

- "If we do not believe in freedom of speech for those we despise, we do not believe in it at all." - Noam Chomsky
- "Humans are not a rational animal, but a rationalizing one." - Leon Festinger

http://avaaz.org - The World In Action
Reply
01-23-2012, 02:50 AM,
#9
RE: Awesome statement From piratebay re SOPA & PIPA
I'm still loving this video, reposted it on a social network the other day, thought it was here for a moment...





If anyone can find any related articles/papers on how the "industry" spurred file-sharing copyrighted material by offering distribution of p2p software, please, do post at least some links.
"He that saith he abideth in him ought himself also so to walk, even as he walked." -- 1 John 2:6
"Whatever affects one directly, affects all indirectly... This is the interrelated structure of reality." -- Martin Luther King Jr.
"He that answereth a matter before he heareth it, it is folly and shame unto him." -- Proverbs 18:13
"Everyone thinks of changing the world, but no one thinks of changing himself." -- Leo Tolstoy
"To love is to be vulnerable" -- C.S Lewis

The Kingdom of God is within you! -- Luke 17:20-21

https://duckduckgo.com/
Reply
01-23-2012, 05:20 AM,
#10
RE: Awesome statement From piratebay re SOPA & PIPA
(01-19-2012, 07:24 PM)h3rm35 Wrote: still love edison´s footage of him electrocuting an elephant featured in the film ¨Land of the Blind¨ while he was fighting to secure his angle in the AC vs. DC debate... Now that was an original film. A perfect example of how edison was a complete jackass. Can you imagine what the world would be like if Tesla ended up with notoriety he deserved?

There aren't too many seeders for this one on TPB, but 'Noid also has a copy that, while larger, has twice as many seeders at this point and may download a bit quicker.
Truth appears in many forms. Find those that resonate with you.

- "If we do not believe in freedom of speech for those we despise, we do not believe in it at all." - Noam Chomsky
- "Humans are not a rational animal, but a rationalizing one." - Leon Festinger

http://avaaz.org - The World In Action
Reply
01-24-2012, 11:12 AM,
#11
RE: Awesome statement From piratebay re SOPA & PIPA
Posted by 'No Consent' on our FB group:



"He that saith he abideth in him ought himself also so to walk, even as he walked." -- 1 John 2:6
"Whatever affects one directly, affects all indirectly... This is the interrelated structure of reality." -- Martin Luther King Jr.
"He that answereth a matter before he heareth it, it is folly and shame unto him." -- Proverbs 18:13
"Everyone thinks of changing the world, but no one thinks of changing himself." -- Leo Tolstoy
"To love is to be vulnerable" -- C.S Lewis

The Kingdom of God is within you! -- Luke 17:20-21

https://duckduckgo.com/
Reply
01-24-2012, 02:07 PM,
#12
RE: Awesome statement From piratebay re SOPA & PIPA
(01-24-2012, 11:12 AM)Dunamis Wrote: Posted by 'No Consent' on our FB group:

This guy's entire argument is based on the assumption that Megaupload kept a record of every upload and download. Where is his proof that this is true?

[Image: randquote.png]
Reply
01-24-2012, 08:13 PM,
#13
RE: Awesome statement From piratebay re SOPA & PIPA
(01-24-2012, 02:07 PM)yeti Wrote:
(01-24-2012, 11:12 AM)Dunamis Wrote: Posted by 'No Consent' on our FB group:

This guy's entire argument is based on the assumption that Megaupload kept a record of every upload and download. Where is his proof that this is true?

Correct. Not to mention, not all the users are registered. Ive used MU plenty of times- never registered and I doubt they know what Ive DL'd from them if I never registered a username or anything. It could be anyone with access to this PC for all they know.
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01-24-2012, 10:02 PM,
#14
RE: Awesome statement From piratebay re SOPA & PIPA
From what I recall, he alluded to the fact that it is those that had paid to use the premium service, and I really would not be all that shocked if they have kept IP's of those who paid, probably due to those who own/funded the site.

But of course time will tell, but I wouldn't be shocked, so many have been prosecuted years after such "infringements" have taken place. And the private prisons note, especially for the UK if such actions start here.

Top note though is, if the USA is still trying to get Richard O'Dwyer who has made no money from his site, and didn;t even host anything, only provided links to sites that did, then nothing is out of the question currently. Who'd have thought that in a time when youtube gets away with such stuff, another site would be closed for doing the same, even though the former is more "known" mainstream wise.
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01-25-2012, 12:02 PM,
#15
RE: Awesome statement From piratebay re SOPA & PIPA
Because it's Jewtube? j/k. LOL
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