Thread Rating:
  • 1 Vote(s) - 5 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
The Price of Free Corn... George Gordans telling of "The Pigs of the Okefenoke"
12-06-2011, 03:56 PM, (This post was last modified: 12-07-2011, 06:10 AM by Mami.)
#1
The Price of Free Corn...
[Image: Pigs_image001.jpg]


The Price of Free Corn... based on a telling by George Gordon

Some years ago, an old trapper from North Dakota hitched up some horses to his Studebaker truck, packed a few possessions and drove south.

Several weeks later he stopped in a small town just north of the Okefenokee Swamp in Georgia.

It was a Saturday morning -- a lazy day -- when he walked into the general store. Sitting around the pot-bellied stove were seven or eight of the town's local citizens.

The traveler spoke. "Gentlemen, could you direct me to the Okefenokee Swamp?"

Some of the old-timers looked at him like he was crazy. "You must be a stranger in these parts," they said.

"I'm from North Dakota," said the stranger.


[Image: Pigs_image002.jpg]


"In the Okefenokee Swamp are thousands of wild hogs." one old man explained. "A man who goes into the swamp by himself asks to die!" He lifted up his leg. "I lost half my leg here, to the pigs of the swamp."

Another old fellow said, "Look at the cuts on me; look at my arm bit off! Those pigs have been free since the Revolution, eating snakes and roots and fending for themselves for over a hundred years. They're wild and they're dangerous. You can't trap them. No man dares go into the swamp by himself." Every man nodded his head in agreement.


The old trapper said, "Thank you so much for the warning. Now could you direct me to the swamp?"

They said, "Well, yeah, it's due south -- straight down the road." But they begged the stranger not to go, because they knew he'd meet a terrible fate.

He said, "Sell me ten sacks of corn, and help me load it in the wagon." And they did. Then the old trapper bid them farewell and drove on down the road. The townsfolk thought they'd never see him again.

Two weeks later the man came back. He pulled up to the general store, walked in and bought ten more sacks of corn. After loading it up he went back down the road toward the swamp.

Two weeks later he returned and again bought ten sacks of corn. This went on for a month. And then two months, and three. Every week or two the old trapper would come into town on a Saturday morning, load up ten sacks of corn, and drive off south into the swamp.

The stranger soon became a legend in the little village and the subject of much speculation. People wondered what kind of devil had possessed this man that he could go into the Okefenokee by himself and not be consumed by the wild and free hogs.

One morning the man came into town as usual. Everyone thought he wanted more corn. He got off the wagon and went into the store where the usual group of men was gathered around the stove. He took off his gloves.

"Gentlemen," he said, "I need to hire about ten or fifteen wagons. I need twenty or thirty men. I have six thousand hogs out in the swamp, penned up, and they're all hungry. I've got to get them to market right away."

"You've WHAT in the swamp?" asked the storekeeper.

"I have six thousand hogs penned up. They haven't eaten for two or three days, and they'll starve if I don't get back there to feed and take care of them."

One of the old timers said, "You mean you've captured the wild hogs of the Okefenokee?"

"That's right."

"How did you do that? What did you do?" the men urged. One of them exclaimed, "But I lost my arm!" "I lost my brother!" cried another. "I lost my leg to those wild boars!" chimed a third.

The trapper said, "Well, the first week I went in there they were wild all right. They hid in the undergrowth and wouldn't come out. I dared not get off the wagon. So I spread corn along behind the wagon. Every day I'd spread a sack of corn. The old pigs would have nothing to do with it."

"But the younger pigs decided that it was easier to eat free corn than it was to root out roots and catch snakes. So the very young began to eat the corn first. I did this every day. Pretty soon, even the old pigs decided that it was easier to eat free corn. After all, they were all free; they were not penned up. They could run off in any direction they wanted at any time."

"The next thing was to get them used to eating in the same place all the time. So I selected a clearing, and I started putting the corn in the clearing. At first they wouldn't come to the clearing. It was too far. It was too open. It was a nuisance to them."

"But the very young decided that it was easier to take the corn in the clearing than it was to root out roots and catch their own snakes. And not long thereafter, the older pigs also decided that it was easier to come to the clearing every day."

"And so the pigs learned to come to the clearing every day to get their free corn. They could still subsidize their diet with roots and snakes and whatever else they wanted. After all, they were all free. They could run in any direction at any time. There were no bounds upon them."

"The next step was to get them used to fence posts. So I put fence posts all the way around the clearing. I put them in the underbrush so that they wouldn't get suspicious or upset. After all, they were just sticks sticking up out of the ground, like the trees and the brush. The corn was there every day. It was easy to walk in between the posts, get the corn, and walk back out."

"This went on for a week or two. Shortly they became very used to walking into the clearing, getting the free corn, and walking back out through the fence posts."

"The next step was to put one rail down at the bottom. I also left a few openings, so that the older, fatter pigs could walk through the openings and the younger pigs could easily jump over just one rail. After all, it was no real threat to their freedom or independence. They could always jump over the rail and flee in any direction at any time."

"Now I decided that I wouldn't feed them every day. I began to feed them every other day. On the days I didn't feed them, the pigs still gathered in the clearing. They squealed, and they grunted, and they begged and pleaded with me to feed them. But I only fed them every other day. And I put a second rail around the posts."

"Now the pigs became more and more desperate for food. Because now they were no longer used to going out and digging their own roots and finding their own food. They now needed me. They needed my corn every other day. So I trained them that I would feed them every day if they came in through a gate. And I put up a third rail around the fence. But it was still no great threat to their freedom, because there were several gates and they could run in and out at will."

"Finally I put up the fourth rail. Then I closed all the gates but one, and I fed them very, very well.

Yesterday I closed the last gate. And today I need you to help me take these pigs to market."


[Image: Pigs_image003.jpg]


"..it does not require a majority to prevail, but rather an irate, tireless minority keen to set brush fires in people's minds.."-- Samuel Adams


"There are a thousand hacking at the branches of evil to one who is striking at the root." -- Henry David Thoreau


"When the people fear their Government, there is tyranny. When the Government fears it's people, there is liberty.." -- Thomas Paine


[Image: Pigs_image004.jpg]


Time for a Change?

The price of free corn The allegory of the pigs has a serious moral lesson. This story is about federal money being used to bait, trap and enslave a once free and independent people. Federal welfare, in its myriad forms, has reduced individuals to a state of dependency. State and local governments are also on the fast track to elimination, due to their functions being subverted by the command and control structures of federal "revenue sharing" programs. Please copy this Internet page link and send it to all your state and local elected leaders and other concerned citizens. Tell them: "Just say NO to federal corn."


[Image: Pigs_image005.jpg]


Just remember; The bacon you save may be your own.

http://cafr1.com/Pigs/Pigs.html

.
Reply
12-06-2011, 09:35 PM,
#2
RE: The Price of Free Corn...
Very good! It' based on a story told by George Gordon, if you don't like to read and rather listen to George tell the story, here's the link:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NAQxRcHWfWM
Reply
12-06-2011, 11:28 PM,
#3
RE: The Price of Free Corn...
Thanks Hans, Ill extract the audio and upload it in a torrent
Reply
12-07-2011, 07:07 AM,
#4
George Gordans telling of

Torrent uploaded by Mami at http://concen.org/tracker/torrents-details.php?id=26575&hit=1
--------------------
.
[Image: George.jpg]


George Gordans telling of "The Pigs of the Okefenoke"

Who Is George Gordon?

George Gordon is the nation's foremost teacher of pro se courtroom strategy and procedure, a pioneer who taught himself the ins and outs of defending himself in court when Big Brother put him out of business. He is an author, lecturer, father and former corporate president. In 1979, he created Barrister's Inn in Boise, Idaho to teach civil law and courtroom strategy and procedure. In 1985, he moved to Isabella, Missouri, and created George Gordon's School of Law, which has been a leader in teaching individuals to successfully represent themselves in the civil court system.

George's experience over the years includes six cases of his that have gone to the U.S. Supreme Court and numerous others that have gone the distance in various state or federal courts. These have ranged from custody cases involving grandparents' rights, through Title 42 suits over civil rights violations by local or state authorities (one of which was even settled in gold), to cases on personal status. Some have even affected national courtroom procedure such as Gordon v. Idaho, 778 F2d 1397, in which the Federal 9th Circuit Court of Appeals ruled that an individual no longer has to take an oath or affirmation in court, if his reason for not taking it is based on the fact that the Bible (which they so kindly provide for you to swear on) says that you shouldn't swear oaths. If you add in the cases where students of his were parties to the action, the number goes into the hundreds, if not the thousands. Many questions as to an individual's status and his relationship with various governmental bodies have first been answered in cases involving George or his students.

In addition to teaching pro se litigation, George is also one of the nation's few teachers of the Mosaic Law. In fact, he is one of the only people in the United States, if not the world, to practice this Law in its entirety. This adherence to a Law and its attendant moral code (which was not done away with, no matter what is being taught in the churches out there) has made George a target of, yet virtually untouched by, both governmental and religious groups--something few people can claim.

George is a subsistence farmer using organic methods to practice land stewardship pursuant to the Scriptural land laws. He and his family are living peacefully in the Ozark Mountains of Missouri and are doing so without any Social Security Numbers, marriage licenses, business permits, insurance, innoculations, bank loans, credit cards, public school, government inspections, in fact, without any government intrusion into their lives. He observes the Mosaic Law and does not advocate, nor teach, anarchy, civil disobedience, or racism.

While he has successfully used common law pleadings in both state and federal courts, he is not now, nor has he ever been, associated with the erroneous 'common law courts' that have been springing up over the past few years, nor with such groups as the Montana Freemen or the 'Republic of Texas.' He is an individual and, as such, belongs to no groups. Also, contrary to what has been reported, he is not in hiding, he is not in prison (in fact, he has never been in prison, particularly not over taxes; his only confrontation with the IRS resulted in a win), and (to paraphrase Mark Twain) the reports of his death are greatly exaggerated. He is alive, doing well, and teaching classes in Isabella, Missouri.

http://library.georgegordon.com/


[swf]http://www.youtube.com/v/NAQxRcHWfWM?.swf[/swf]


[swf]http://www.youtube.com/v/GHxd1sb5MJ8?.swf[/swf]


NOTE: I extracted the audio and joined them

Download audio here direct

---------------------------------------------------


[Image: Pigs_image001.jpg]


The Price of Free Corn... (Short version by Walter Burien) based on a telling by George Gordon

Some years ago, an old trapper from North Dakota hitched up some horses to his Studebaker truck, packed a few possessions and drove south.

Several weeks later he stopped in a small town just north of the Okefenokee Swamp in Georgia.

It was a Saturday morning -- a lazy day -- when he walked into the general store. Sitting around the pot-bellied stove were seven or eight of the town's local citizens.

The traveler spoke. "Gentlemen, could you direct me to the Okefenokee Swamp?"

Some of the old-timers looked at him like he was crazy. "You must be a stranger in these parts," they said.

"I'm from North Dakota," said the stranger.


[Image: Pigs_image002.jpg]


"In the Okefenokee Swamp are thousands of wild hogs." one old man explained. "A man who goes into the swamp by himself asks to die!" He lifted up his leg. "I lost half my leg here, to the pigs of the swamp."

Another old fellow said, "Look at the cuts on me; look at my arm bit off! Those pigs have been free since the Revolution, eating snakes and roots and fending for themselves for over a hundred years. They're wild and they're dangerous. You can't trap them. No man dares go into the swamp by himself." Every man nodded his head in agreement.


The old trapper said, "Thank you so much for the warning. Now could you direct me to the swamp?"

They said, "Well, yeah, it's due south -- straight down the road." But they begged the stranger not to go, because they knew he'd meet a terrible fate.

He said, "Sell me ten sacks of corn, and help me load it in the wagon." And they did. Then the old trapper bid them farewell and drove on down the road. The townsfolk thought they'd never see him again.

Two weeks later the man came back. He pulled up to the general store, walked in and bought ten more sacks of corn. After loading it up he went back down the road toward the swamp.

Two weeks later he returned and again bought ten sacks of corn. This went on for a month. And then two months, and three. Every week or two the old trapper would come into town on a Saturday morning, load up ten sacks of corn, and drive off south into the swamp.

The stranger soon became a legend in the little village and the subject of much speculation. People wondered what kind of devil had possessed this man that he could go into the Okefenokee by himself and not be consumed by the wild and free hogs.

One morning the man came into town as usual. Everyone thought he wanted more corn. He got off the wagon and went into the store where the usual group of men was gathered around the stove. He took off his gloves.

"Gentlemen," he said, "I need to hire about ten or fifteen wagons. I need twenty or thirty men. I have six thousand hogs out in the swamp, penned up, and they're all hungry. I've got to get them to market right away."

"You've WHAT in the swamp?" asked the storekeeper.

"I have six thousand hogs penned up. They haven't eaten for two or three days, and they'll starve if I don't get back there to feed and take care of them."

One of the old timers said, "You mean you've captured the wild hogs of the Okefenokee?"

"That's right."

"How did you do that? What did you do?" the men urged. One of them exclaimed, "But I lost my arm!" "I lost my brother!" cried another. "I lost my leg to those wild boars!" chimed a third.

The trapper said, "Well, the first week I went in there they were wild all right. They hid in the undergrowth and wouldn't come out. I dared not get off the wagon. So I spread corn along behind the wagon. Every day I'd spread a sack of corn. The old pigs would have nothing to do with it."

"But the younger pigs decided that it was easier to eat free corn than it was to root out roots and catch snakes. So the very young began to eat the corn first. I did this every day. Pretty soon, even the old pigs decided that it was easier to eat free corn. After all, they were all free; they were not penned up. They could run off in any direction they wanted at any time."

"The next thing was to get them used to eating in the same place all the time. So I selected a clearing, and I started putting the corn in the clearing. At first they wouldn't come to the clearing. It was too far. It was too open. It was a nuisance to them."

"But the very young decided that it was easier to take the corn in the clearing than it was to root out roots and catch their own snakes. And not long thereafter, the older pigs also decided that it was easier to come to the clearing every day."

"And so the pigs learned to come to the clearing every day to get their free corn. They could still subsidize their diet with roots and snakes and whatever else they wanted. After all, they were all free. They could run in any direction at any time. There were no bounds upon them."

"The next step was to get them used to fence posts. So I put fence posts all the way around the clearing. I put them in the underbrush so that they wouldn't get suspicious or upset. After all, they were just sticks sticking up out of the ground, like the trees and the brush. The corn was there every day. It was easy to walk in between the posts, get the corn, and walk back out."

"This went on for a week or two. Shortly they became very used to walking into the clearing, getting the free corn, and walking back out through the fence posts."

"The next step was to put one rail down at the bottom. I also left a few openings, so that the older, fatter pigs could walk through the openings and the younger pigs could easily jump over just one rail. After all, it was no real threat to their freedom or independence. They could always jump over the rail and flee in any direction at any time."

"Now I decided that I wouldn't feed them every day. I began to feed them every other day. On the days I didn't feed them, the pigs still gathered in the clearing. They squealed, and they grunted, and they begged and pleaded with me to feed them. But I only fed them every other day. And I put a second rail around the posts."

"Now the pigs became more and more desperate for food. Because now they were no longer used to going out and digging their own roots and finding their own food. They now needed me. They needed my corn every other day. So I trained them that I would feed them every day if they came in through a gate. And I put up a third rail around the fence. But it was still no great threat to their freedom, because there were several gates and they could run in and out at will."

"Finally I put up the fourth rail. Then I closed all the gates but one, and I fed them very, very well.

Yesterday I closed the last gate. And today I need you to help me take these pigs to market."


[Image: Pigs_image003.jpg]


"..it does not require a majority to prevail, but rather an irate, tireless minority keen to set brush fires in people's minds.."-- Samuel Adams


"There are a thousand hacking at the branches of evil to one who is striking at the root." -- Henry David Thoreau


"When the people fear their Government, there is tyranny. When the Government fears it's people, there is liberty.." -- Thomas Paine


[Image: Pigs_image004.jpg]


Time for a Change?

The price of free corn The allegory of the pigs has a serious moral lesson. This story is about federal money being used to bait, trap and enslave a once free and independent people. Federal welfare, in its myriad forms, has reduced individuals to a state of dependency. State and local governments are also on the fast track to elimination, due to their functions being subverted by the command and control structures of federal "revenue sharing" programs. Please copy this Internet page link and send it to all your state and local elected leaders and other concerned citizens. Tell them: "Just say NO to federal corn."


[Image: Pigs_image005.jpg]


Just remember; The bacon you save may be your own.

http://cafr1.com/Pigs/Pigs.html

.


.
Reply
12-07-2011, 08:02 AM,
#5
RE: The Price of Free Corn... George Gordans telling of "The Pigs of the Okefenoke"
Such an applicable analogy to so many social engineering tactics. How they are aimed at the younger generations, the bribe of convenience, the illusion of free, the fence being built around the prey with an illusion of freedom and/or choice..

It also applies to social welfare, education, almost all technology and, of course, modern cities. You can also be more abstract and apply it to realms of compartmentalized thought. The internet stands out for me with some recent research into the deployment of the massive technocratic infrastructure being sold worldwide as a convenient means of communication, regulation, security, education, government, commerce. It's called the internet and it's next phase is an all encompassing centralized control mechanism.

This piece also reminded me of a video ..

Statism is Dead - Part 3 - The Matrix




The whole series makes good philosophical points to reflect on, be wary not to just accept his rationale and do yourself a favour. Also related from Freedomain Radio.

The Story of Your Enslavement
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xbp6umQT58A

I heard a good audio recently on how to see through some of this Jan Irvin - Trivium Education on Red Ice Radio (2011.08.18).
There are no others, there is only us.
http://FastTadpole.com/
Reply


Possibly Related Threads...
Thread Author Replies Views Last Post
  Free energy - Japanese car datars 1 374 11-09-2013, 08:59 PM
Last Post: Easy Skanking
  George Bush, Skull and Bones, the CIA and Illicit Drug Operations datars 0 385 07-15-2013, 10:40 PM
Last Post: datars
  Petraeus, Allen, Gaouette, Ham: The Benghazi Story The Media Isn’t Telling You datars 0 419 11-18-2012, 07:42 AM
Last Post: datars
  Signing of Bill HR 347 - Obama Makes Free Speech A Felony datars 5 1,121 07-20-2012, 07:18 PM
Last Post: ezekiel73
  Free ebook: In the Footsteps of the Flock Solve et Coagula 0 498 04-23-2012, 05:39 PM
Last Post: Solve et Coagula
  Free ebook: Genocide in the Holy Land Solve et Coagula 0 556 04-23-2012, 03:44 PM
Last Post: Solve et Coagula
  Free ebook: The Holocaust Victims Accuse; Docs & Testimony on Jewish War Criminals Solve et Coagula 0 327 04-23-2012, 11:32 AM
Last Post: Solve et Coagula
  Should education be free? Sovereignman 5 886 04-16-2012, 05:35 AM
Last Post: yeti
  Humans are doomed to pay a very high price for their cruelty to animals Solve et Coagula 0 339 02-20-2012, 05:47 PM
Last Post: Solve et Coagula
Information Giant Sucking Sound Part 2: Trans-Pacific Partnership Akin to NAFTA, Free Trade FastTadpole 0 460 09-12-2011, 10:33 PM
Last Post: FastTadpole

Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)