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U.s. Anti-drug Smuggling Efforts Declining
08-07-2006, 11:57 AM,
#1
U.s. Anti-drug Smuggling Efforts Declining
2005 article, but why would they want more control, as they are the biggest dealers around by far

By Alan Elsner

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The U.S. military's ability to patrol the skies to intercept illegal drugs entering the country has sharply declined in the past two years, a congressional subcommittee heard on Tuesday.

Indiana Republican Rep. Mark Souder, who chairs the House of Representatives subcommittee on criminal justice, drug policy and human resources, cited figures showing that patrols through a narcotics transit zone that includes the Caribbean Sea and the Gulf of Mexico had fallen by 71 percent in two years from 5,964 hours in 2002 to 1,741 hours last year.

At the same time, the number of U.S. Air Force sites operating balloon-borne radars has fallen from 14 to eight since 2000.

"This has left the U.S. nearly blind to air and marine smuggling activities along the entire Gulf Coast (from the east coast of Texas to the southern tip of Florida) and from the eastern coast of Florida to Puerto Rico," Souder told the subcommittee.

Pentagon officials testified that the reduced aerial surveillance resulted from the gradual phaseout of aging P-3 aircraft, most of which were produced 30 or 40 years ago and were a mainstay of America's capability dating back to the 1962 Cuban missile crisis.

Capt. Edmund Turner of the U.S. Southern Command said the P-3 was a "legacy aircraft that is on its way out" and the Navy hoped to have a replacement by 2012.

Marybeth Long, assistant secretary of defense, told Souder, "There are gaps, you are absolutely right. We are working to address them."

The balloon-based radars, known as the Tethered Aerostat Radar System, has been operating since 1985. Control was transferred from the Customs Service to the Air Force in 2000 and the since then the system has been in decline.

The Department of Defense is asking for $896 million for fiscal 2006 to finance counternarcotics operations. Its representatives told the subcommittee their efforts to fight drugs in Colombia, Afghanistan and elsewhere were scoring major successes.

But Rep. Elijah Cummings, a Maryland Democrat, said record seizures of illegal drugs last year had done nothing to reduce their availability or price on the streets of U.S. cities.

Since 1998, the United States has invested almost $3 billion fighting drug trafficking in Colombia, the source of around 90 percent of the cocaine reaching the United States. Turner said its efforts to train the Colombian military and strengthen government institutions were bearing fruit, although "narco-terrorists" still exercised some level of control over 40 percent of the country.

In Afghanistan which produces over 80 percent of the world's heroin, there had been an explosion of production and trafficking since the U.S. invasion of 2001 toppled the former Taliban government.

Souder said that if current trends in heroin production were not reversed, the destabilizing effects of the drug trade could threaten Afghanistan's fledgling democracy.

"There will be no quick fix to Afghanistan's counternarcotics challenge," said Capt. Jim Stahlman of U.S. central command.
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08-09-2006, 05:04 PM,
#2
U.s. Anti-drug Smuggling Efforts Declining
Quote:But Rep. Elijah Cummings, a Maryland Democrat, said record seizures of illegal drugs last year had done nothing to reduce their availability or price on the streets of U.S. cities.

You'd think after, what, 20 years of failed policy someone might figure it out. Do they just say this shit to make their conshituents (sic) think they're earning their keep in Congress?
Don't believe anything they say.
And at the same time,
Don't believe that they say anything without a reason.
---Immanuel Kant
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09-23-2006, 12:03 AM,
#3
U.s. Anti-drug Smuggling Efforts Declining
Never underestimate the power of vested interests.

On a side note a scandal went un-noticed recently in the UK when we found out that several members of parliament have shares/ownership in synthetic diamorphine production corporations. Drug money keeps the economy afloat [ask Mike Ruppert and his female banking guru friend] either legally or illegally.

All these people are hypocritical scum.
"We are just glorified monkeys in suits.... show me where it's written we should be able to model the cosmos?!" -Terence McKenna, 21st Century Bard
R.I.P-ranks Terence. I miss your take on life.
=-=
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09-23-2006, 08:24 PM,
#4
U.s. Anti-drug Smuggling Efforts Declining
Making it illegal allows them to better control the market for themselves, thats it.

Human beings are not gonna stop using drugs, and yes its a big part of our economy.

We should just be honest and realistic about it, but then those assholes would lose their monoploies...
Wyrd bi∂ ful aræd : Vituð ér enn eða hvat?
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
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09-26-2006, 03:10 PM,
#5
U.s. Anti-drug Smuggling Efforts Declining
Quote:Human beings are not gonna stop using drugs, and yes its a big part of our economy.
We should just be honest and realistic about it, but then those assholes would lose their monoploies...

Exactly DSB - It seems so obvious and HAS been obvious when you look back to early industrial England where many [and I mean more than we all would think] people used to get up and take opium/laudanum before work in the awful, disgusting mill machining houses. And who can blame them for wanting a bit of psychic dulling in that environment... it's todays equivalent of a customer servshit job.

Anyway the point was that all these people could go get their stuff cheap [really cheap - England was shipping it over by the boatful] from the chemist/pharmacy and there was no problem. Very little social problem and really very minimal personal or health problems DIRECTLY link to its use.

We create the addiction damage by the environment we let companies and politicians make for us.
"We are just glorified monkeys in suits.... show me where it's written we should be able to model the cosmos?!" -Terence McKenna, 21st Century Bard
R.I.P-ranks Terence. I miss your take on life.
=-=
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10-13-2006, 02:50 PM,
#6
U.s. Anti-drug Smuggling Efforts Declining
the best thing that could happen here in colombia is for the USA and europe to legallize drugs, you stop trafficking inmediately because the plantations are performed by big industries as the tobacco companies, and the guerrillas and the AUC can stop damaging natural reserves because tyhey can just plant in regular farms

unfortunately it is the first world the one that has to take the decision, if we unilaterally legalize , well be another cuba blocked from the world
[Image: yet12.jpg]
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10-13-2006, 03:32 PM, (This post was last modified: 10-13-2006, 03:32 PM by corrosion.)
#7
U.s. Anti-drug Smuggling Efforts Declining
Not only do you stop smuggling, you also are adding money to the government economy and allow people to stop working in poor conditions for minimal cash.

You can also monitor the intake of what people are using by keeping a database of intake and regulating amounts allowed to consume.

Youll never stop people from using intoxicants, so why not legalize them and take a burdon off the shoulders of law enforcement so they can work on more important things like dangerous offenders corporate and sex crimes.
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10-13-2006, 03:59 PM,
#8
U.s. Anti-drug Smuggling Efforts Declining
Quote:Not only do you stop smuggling, you also are adding money to the government economy and allow people to stop working in poor conditions for minimal cash.

You can also monitor the intake of what people are using by keeping a database of intake and regulating amounts allowed to consume.

Youll never stop people from using intoxicants, so why not legalize them and take a burdon off the shoulders of law enforcement so they can work on more important things like dangerous offenders corporate and sex crimes.
agree completely, and remember, in the war on drugs, the blood you see everywhere is mostly colombian
[Image: yet12.jpg]
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10-13-2006, 04:40 PM,
#9
U.s. Anti-drug Smuggling Efforts Declining
You forgot....Poor when you say the word Columbian.
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10-17-2006, 04:23 PM,
#10
U.s. Anti-drug Smuggling Efforts Declining
Quote:You forgot....Poor when you say the word Columbian.
why poor?? not only poor, people has died in this war... people from the middle and upper class also has suffered, for example, the Nogal Bombing 3 years ago killed 400 people mostly from the richer part of bogota

we colombians have our own flaws, we were the ones that began to grow coca, marihuana and amapola in the first place, we were the ones that created and brought the cartel violence to our streets, we were the ones that in cities like cali and medellin accepted de narcos living among us and even respected them, we brought the war and USA was very happy to watch us fight

americans don´t want to stop this war.. it is a big business for them...
[Image: yet12.jpg]
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10-17-2006, 04:28 PM,
#11
U.s. Anti-drug Smuggling Efforts Declining
Not as much as it could be if it was legalized. Then however they would have to pay market rate for drugs instead of basement prices like Starbucks and coffee beans.
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10-17-2006, 05:22 PM,
#12
U.s. Anti-drug Smuggling Efforts Declining
Quote:Not as much as it could be if it was legalized. Then however they would have to pay market rate for drugs instead of basement prices like Starbucks and coffee beans.
thats talking in agricultural terms, but who sell the guns to the colombian army?? who controls the natural resources cheaper because of the security problems?? who makes colombia dependant ion USA help?


they dont need to legalize, the business is greater if drugs remain illegal
[Image: yet12.jpg]
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