Thread Rating:
  • 0 Vote(s) - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
New Research Due On The 9/11 Drugs Link
08-21-2006, 05:59 PM,
#1
New Research Due On The 9/11 Drugs Link
Myself and jackamo23 [who keeps getting his account refused when he tries to join??] are collating info on this area and will post here and on ConRes as we get to the set stages of evidence collection.

Watch this space. May take some time 'cos it's a veritable jigsaw the size of the old WTC Towers. :o
"We are just glorified monkeys in suits.... show me where it's written we should be able to model the cosmos?!" -Terence McKenna, 21st Century Bard
R.I.P-ranks Terence. I miss your take on life.
=-=
Reply
08-21-2006, 07:35 PM,
#2
New Research Due On The 9/11 Drugs Link
Here's one article to be getting on with... however, don't believe the title one bit.

The CIA and Mi6 are in control of opiate price structuring.... and no I'm NOT getting that info from James [Mi5 honest guv] Casbolt.


Quote:"Price of Heroin going up"

It is ironic that when the Taliban were in control heroin supplies were at minimum levels. A few years of occupation soon rectifies the supply problems. Wasn't the level of heroin production, one of the reasons for occupation.

Strange times.!


Taliban's terror tactics reconquer Afghanistan
By Nelofer Pazira in Kandahar
Published: 20 August 2006

"If we die, we are martyrs - if we live, we are victors," say the Taliban in the Panjwai district of Kandahar province. They have taken control of the area in less than two weeks. For, with ever accelerating speed, the Taliban are reconquering south-west Afghanistan from the government, American and Nato forces sent to fight them.

It took Besmillah, a villager from Panjwai, three hours to get from his home to Kandahar, a journey that usually takes an hour. "There were bodies on the road," he says, "at least 40 bodies - of Afghan soldiers - lying in a place called Yakh Chah [Ice Well], halfway between Shykh Kalandar and the municipality of Panjwai. The Taliban have a madrasa in Shykh Kalandar and they were attacking the municipality from there at first. But now they have taken the whole district. I saw two cars on fire. I had to go through the fields and take side roads to make it to Kandahar."

Panjwai, 30km west of Kandahar, is one of the more prosperous districts in the province. It's been 12 days since the fighting began there. "At first, Canadians were there too," Besmillah says. "But I don't know what happened. They left, and now there is only the Afghan army."

The Taliban have told the district's mayor that he will be left untouched providing he and his men stay where they are and forbid Nato forces permission to enter the area, Besmillah says.

"The Taliban have kept the soldiers' bodies because they have asked for 10 rocket-propelled grenades in return for each corpse," he says. Another account suggests that the Taliban have asked for the release of prisoners in return for the bodies. Temperature this week have been hitting 44C. "The bodies will rot and people will be affected by their smell," he says.

Another man from Pashmoul, Panjwai, who left his home three days ago, says the Taliban had taken over his village too. "The Taliban were hiding there for a long time," he says. "Before, when the American convoys were passing, we used to ask them: 'Why don't you attack them?' They'd say they didn't have enough weapons, or that they hadn't yet received orders," he explains. "But now, no foreigners can pass. Not in convoys or on foot."

Besmillah - many Afghans only have one name - says that the Taliban search everyone on the road. "I went through three Taliban checkpoints and one government checkpoint by the time I made it to Kandahar. The Taliban were in control right up to Solahan, about 25 km west of Kandahar. They look for papers and check the mobile phones. If a number stored in the phone seems suspicious, they call it. And if the voice answers in English, they immediately kill the owner of the mobile. They don't let anyone from outside the villages go into the area."

Besmillah complains that local people are trapped between the Taliban and the government. "The Taliban came and asked us for food. Then the army came and demanded to know why we were feeding the Taliban. We fed the army too. It's our tradition; when someone comes and asks for food, we give it to them. Now it's better that only the Taliban control the area."

Hamid, another villager from Panjwai, says that the Taliban in his district have little money but they have mobile phones. "They are all Afghans. I haven't seen a single outsider among them. But they talk to Pakistan two, three times a day on the phone." Hamid says that the goal of the Taliban is to re-establish their government. "They trust us and tell us a lot of things. They say that once they take Kandahar, they will continue onwards to Kabul till they take all of Afghanistan," he says.

Meanwhile, the Taliban have issued a new law which they have posted on the walls. It says: "We have no courtrooms to take people for questioning. Judgment is made on the road - wherever an infidel is captured. The order is carried out immediately. The punishment for spying for the government and working with foreigners is beheading."

In Helmand province, where the Taliban also control most of the area - except for the municipality - despite the presence of 4,000 British troops, a 70-year-old woman and her son were hanged by the Taliban on charges of spying for the government.

"If we die, we are martyrs - if we live, we are victors," say the Taliban in the Panjwai district of Kandahar province. They have taken control of the area in less than two weeks. For, with ever accelerating speed, the Taliban are reconquering south-west Afghanistan from the government, American and Nato forces sent to fight them.

It took Besmillah, a villager from Panjwai, three hours to get from his home to Kandahar, a journey that usually takes an hour. "There were bodies on the road," he says, "at least 40 bodies - of Afghan soldiers - lying in a place called Yakh Chah [Ice Well], halfway between Shykh Kalandar and the municipality of Panjwai. The Taliban have a madrasa in Shykh Kalandar and they were attacking the municipality from there at first. But now they have taken the whole district. I saw two cars on fire. I had to go through the fields and take side roads to make it to Kandahar."

Panjwai, 30km west of Kandahar, is one of the more prosperous districts in the province. It's been 12 days since the fighting began there. "At first, Canadians were there too," Besmillah says. "But I don't know what happened. They left, and now there is only the Afghan army."

The Taliban have told the district's mayor that he will be left untouched providing he and his men stay where they are and forbid Nato forces permission to enter the area, Besmillah says.

"The Taliban have kept the soldiers' bodies because they have asked for 10 rocket-propelled grenades in return for each corpse," he says. Another account suggests that the Taliban have asked for the release of prisoners in return for the bodies. Temperature this week have been hitting 44C. "The bodies will rot and people will be affected by their smell," he says.

Another man from Pashmoul, Panjwai, who left his home three days ago, says the Taliban had taken over his village too. "The Taliban were hiding there for a long time," he says. "Before, when the American convoys were passing, we used to ask them: 'Why don't you attack them?' They'd say they didn't have enough weapons, or that they hadn't yet received orders," he explains. "But now, no foreigners can pass. Not in convoys or on foot."
Besmillah - many Afghans only have one name - says that the Taliban search everyone on the road. "I went through three Taliban checkpoints and one government checkpoint by the time I made it to Kandahar. The Taliban were in control right up to Solahan, about 25 km west of Kandahar. They look for papers and check the mobile phones. If a number stored in the phone seems suspicious, they call it. And if the voice answers in English, they immediately kill the owner of the mobile. They don't let anyone from outside the villages go into the area."

Besmillah complains that local people are trapped between the Taliban and the government. "The Taliban came and asked us for food. Then the army came and demanded to know why we were feeding the Taliban. We fed the army too. It's our tradition; when someone comes and asks for food, we give it to them. Now it's better that only the Taliban control the area."

Hamid, another villager from Panjwai, says that the Taliban in his district have little money but they have mobile phones. "They are all Afghans. I haven't seen a single outsider among them. But they talk to Pakistan two, three times a day on the phone." Hamid says that the goal of the Taliban is to re-establish their government. "They trust us and tell us a lot of things. They say that once they take Kandahar, they will continue onwards to Kabul till they take all of Afghanistan," he says.

Meanwhile, the Taliban have issued a new law which they have posted on the walls. It says: "We have no courtrooms to take people for questioning. Judgment is made on the road - wherever an infidel is captured. The order is carried out immediately. The punishment for spying for the government and working with foreigners is beheading."

In Helmand province, where the Taliban also control most of the area - except for the municipality - despite the presence of 4,000 British troops, a 70-year-old woman and her son were hanged by the Taliban on charges of spying for the government.

=== End Pasted Article

Not strange though really when there is ample evidence that the prime funder of the Illuminaughty budgets has been NOT been oil but narcotics - ever since the Opium Wars during which England was pulling off False Flag ops even then [I jest not!].

When viewed thru the eyes of Hopsicker's research on Mohamed Atta - you being to see that the whole link is heroin...

Saudi/Bush/Bin-Laden/Atta/9-11

...heroin, oil, arms and training is the currency they use. on the back of our misery.

Having been active in researching various parts of the UK drugs/addiction scene and treatment INDUSTRY [and boy is it ever!] for decades now and catalysed by the 1993/4 C.J.B. and 'Operation Nomad' and it's anti-rave/anti-gathering/anti-anything hogwash - we've seen the flow of heroin especially steadily get cheaper and stronger, unhindered by the various imperialist nd domestic changes going on in Afghanistan.

As we know it supplies 90 odd percent of UK/Euro opiates which strangely began to grab market share/dominance as the CIA moved in to aid the fight against the invading commies.


Here's another:

Quote:Record opium crop in Afghanistan adds to security concerns

Fisnik Abrashi
Associated Press
August 20, 2006

KABUL, Afghanistan – Opium cultivation in Afghanistan has hit record levels – up by more than 40 percent from 2005 – despite hundreds of millions in counternarcotics money, Western officials told the Associated Press.

The increase could have serious repercussions for an already grave security situation, with drug lords joining the Taliban-led fight against Afghan and international forces.

A Western anti-narcotics official in Kabul said about 370,650 acres of opium poppy was cultivated this season – up from 257,000 acres in 2005 – citing their preliminary crop projections. The previous record was 323,700 acres in 2004, according to the U.N. Office on Drugs and Crime.

"It is a significant increase from last year … unfortunately, it is a record year," said a senior U.S. government official based in Kabul, who like the other Western officials would speak only on condition of anonymity because of the sensitive topic.

Final figures, and an estimate of the yield of opium resin from the poppies, will be clear only when the U.N. agency completes its assessment of the crop, based on satellite imagery and ground surveys. Its report is due in September.

The U.N. reported last year that Afghanistan produced an estimated 4,500 tons of opium – enough to make 450 tons of heroin – nearly 90 percent of world supply.

This year's preliminary findings indicate a failure in attempts to eradicate poppy cultivation and continuing corruption among provincial officials and police – problems acknowledged by President Hamid Karzai.

Karzai told Fortune magazine in a recent interview that "lots of people" in his administration profited from the narcotics trade and that he had underestimated the difficulty of eradicating opium production.

The U.N. Office on Drugs and Crime estimated that opium accounted for 52 percent of Afghanistan's gross domestic product in 2005.

"Now what they have is a narco-economy. If they do not get corruption sorted they can slip into being a narco-state," the U.S. official warned.

Opium cultivation has surged since the ouster of the Taliban in late 2001. The former regime enforced an effective ban on poppy growing by threatening to jail farmers – virtually eradicating the crop in 2000.

But Afghan and Western counternarcotics officials say Taliban-led militants are now implicated in the drug trade, encouraging poppy cultivation and using the proceeds to help fund their insurgency.

"(That) kind of revenue from that kind of crop aids and abets the enemy," Chief Master Sgt. Curtis L. Brownhill, a senior adviser to the head of the U.S. Central Command, said during a recent visit to Afghanistan. "They count on having that sort of resource and money."

Afghanistan has seen its deadliest bout of fighting this year since U.S.-backed forces toppled the Taliban for harboring Osama bin Laden. Officials believe the insurgency, most vicious in the south – Afghanistan's main poppy belt – includes die-hard Taliban, warlords and drug lords and smugglers.

Fear of fanning the insurgency has constrained efforts to destroy the poppy crops of impoverished farmers – particularly in Helmand, where the area being cultivated for poppies has increased most sharply. The province now accounts for more than 40 percent of the poppy cultivation nationwide.

"We know that if we start eradicating the whole surface of poppy cultivation in Helmand, we will increase the activity of the insurgency and increase the number of insurgents," said Tom Koenigs, the top U.N. official in Afghanistan.

He said the international community needs to provide alternative livelihoods for farmers, but warned against expecting quick results.

"The problem has increased, and the remedy has to adjust," he told reporters recently.
"We are just glorified monkeys in suits.... show me where it's written we should be able to model the cosmos?!" -Terence McKenna, 21st Century Bard
R.I.P-ranks Terence. I miss your take on life.
=-=
Reply


Possibly Related Threads...
Thread Author Replies Views Last Post
Thumbs Up How to Make Money Selling Drugs - Instructional Video CharliePrime 1 663 10-04-2013, 07:54 PM
Last Post: thokling
  CIA-DoD Death Squads & Mexican corruption intertwined, War for Drugs Continues h3rm35 7 2,871 09-06-2012, 12:35 AM
Last Post: h3rm35
  How the Militarized War on Drugs in Latin America Benefits Transnational Corporations mexika 0 704 08-07-2012, 10:56 PM
Last Post: mexika
  U.S. Tells South America to Shut Up About Legalizing Drugs mexika 0 633 03-01-2012, 02:12 AM
Last Post: mexika
  The War On Drugs Is A $2.5 Trillion Racket: How Big Banks, Private Military Com mexika 0 853 07-12-2011, 08:40 AM
Last Post: mexika
  Legalise drugs, says former defence secretary TriWooOx 1 847 03-24-2011, 11:21 PM
Last Post: Beostein
  CIA funnels drugs into poor US neighborhoods mexika 1 1,274 01-30-2011, 12:59 AM
Last Post: springhawk
  Government proposes to scrap need for scientific advice on drugs policy mothandrust 0 760 12-06-2010, 01:22 PM
Last Post: mothandrust
  Partners in Crime: The U.S. Secret State and Mexico's "War on Drugs" mexika 1 821 09-20-2010, 03:15 PM
Last Post: persecuted in alberni
  Our 'war on drugs' has been an abysmal failure. Just look at Mexico mexika 1 738 09-13-2010, 11:36 PM
Last Post: persecuted in alberni

Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)