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Severe Space Weather Events--Understanding Societal and Economic Impacts:
06-03-2009, 01:33 AM, (This post was last modified: 06-03-2009, 01:34 AM by ---.)
#1
Severe Space Weather Events--Understanding Societal and Economic Impacts:
Quote:"The sun's activity waxes and wanes every 11 years or so, with the appearance of sunspots following the same cycle. This period isn't consistent, however. Sometimes the interval between sunspot maxima is as short as nine years, other times as long as 14 years. At the moment the sun appears calm. "We're in the equivalent of an idyllic summer's day. The sun is quiet and benign, the quietest it has been for 100 years," says Mike Hapgood, who chairs the European Space Agency's space weather team, "but it could turn the other way." The next solar maximum is expected in 2012."



Quote:The adverse effects of extreme space weather on modern technology--power grid outages, high-frequency communication blackouts, spacecraft anomalies--are well known and well documented, and the physical processes underlying space weather are also generally well understood. Less well documented and understood, however, are the potential economic and societal impacts of the disruption of critical technological systems by severe space weather.

As a first step toward determining the socioeconomic impacts of extreme space weather events and addressing the questions of space weather risk assessment and management, a public workshop was held in May 2008. The workshop brought together representatives of industry, the government, and academia to consider both direct and collateral effects of severe space weather events, the current state of the space weather services infrastructure in the United States, the needs of users of space weather data and services, and the ramifications of future technological developments for contemporary society's vulnerability to space weather. The workshop concluded with a discussion of un- or underexplored topics that would yield the greatest benefits in space weather risk management.


read it online for free:

http://www.nap.edu/catalog.php?record_id=12507#toc
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06-03-2009, 09:45 PM,
#2
Severe Space Weather Events--Understanding Societal and Economic Impacts:
bump, because it's only had 6 views so far and seeing as it's a more than interesting report and contains potentially very important information to avail oneself of.
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06-05-2009, 09:55 AM,
#3
Severe Space Weather Events--Understanding Societal and Economic Impacts:
well my understanding was that the cycle was every 7 years. not 11.
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06-05-2009, 11:45 AM,
#4
Severe Space Weather Events--Understanding Societal and Economic Impacts:
Maybe you were mistaken..
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06-08-2009, 12:37 PM,
#5
Severe Space Weather Events--Understanding Societal and Economic Impacts:
Quote:Maybe you were mistaken..
Wouldn't be the first time. :msnslap: (Runs out of glasshouse!) :laughkick:

A major solar event is the ideal time for a small nuclear player to "take out" a MAJOR nuclear player.:shitfan: :endnigh:
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06-30-2009, 02:42 PM, (This post was last modified: 06-30-2009, 11:44 PM by ---.)
#6
Severe Space Weather Events--Understanding Societal and Economic Impacts:
Quote:Wouldn't be the first time. :msnslap: (Runs out of glasshouse!) :laughkick:

haha touche

Quote:A major solar event is the ideal time for a small nuclear player to "take out" a MAJOR nuclear player.:shitfan: :endnigh:



or more likely vice-versa? Either way, I wouldn't be surprised to see trouble in some of the hotspots.

well said :)
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07-02-2009, 02:06 PM,
#7
Severe Space Weather Events--Understanding Societal and Economic Impacts:
ahhh the 7 year thing might be the wobble. the sunspot activity thing seems to be between 9 and 14 years. i suggest a few peaks and troughs from these. ill like to see recorded correlations between these for weather patterns over the past few decades. the 7 year wobble should be pretty consistent.
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07-02-2009, 02:17 PM,
#8
Severe Space Weather Events--Understanding Societal and Economic Impacts:
Quote:ahhh the 7 year thing might be the wobble. the sunspot activity thing seems to be between 9 and 14 years. i suggest a few peaks and troughs from these. ill like to see recorded correlations between these for weather patterns over the past few decades. the 7 year wobble should be pretty consistent.

I've been reading the ACTUAL report that this thread is about, as it goes :rolleyes:
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