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Chips in official IDs raise privacy fears
07-14-2009, 10:50 PM, (This post was last modified: 07-14-2009, 10:51 PM by ---.)
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Chips in official IDs raise privacy fears
Chips in official IDs raise privacy fears



In this April 9, 2009 photo, a driver holds up a NEXUS identification card at a border crossing from Canada into the United States in Blaine, Wash. The NEXUS card, with an imbedded radio frequency identification, or RFID, chip that can be read up to 20 feet away, allows pre-screened travelers expedited processing though dedicated traffic lanes between the U.S. and Canada, as well as airports and marine locations. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson) (Elaine Thompson - AP)


In this May 28, 2009 photo, a new "enhanced" United States passport lies, at left, beside an expired pierced passport at an Immigration & Family Law business downtown in Los Angeles. On June 1, it became mandatory for Americans entering the United States by land or sea from Canada, Mexico, Bermuda and the Caribbean to present identity documents embedded with RFID tags, though conventional passports remain valid until they expire. The new passport contains a radio frequency identification chip, indicated by the small graphic below the words "United States of America." (AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes) (Damian Dovarganes - AP)



By TODD LEWAN
The Associated Press
Sunday, July 12, 2009; 6:10 AM

-- Climbing into his Volvo, outfitted with a Matrics antenna and a Motorola reader he'd bought on eBay for $190, Chris Paget cruised the streets of San Francisco with this objective: To read the identity cards of strangers, wirelessly, without ever leaving his car.

It took him 20 minutes to strike hacker's gold.

Zipping past Fisherman's Wharf, his scanner downloaded to his laptop the unique serial numbers of two pedestrians' electronic U.S. passport cards embedded with radio frequency identification, or RFID, tags. Within an hour, he'd "skimmed" four more of the new, microchipped PASS cards from a distance of 20 feet.

Increasingly, government officials are promoting the chipping of identity documents as a 21st century application of technology that will help speed border crossings, safeguard credentials against counterfeiters, and keep terrorists from sneaking into the country.

But Paget's February experiment demonstrated something privacy advocates had feared for years: That RFID, coupled with other technologies, could make people trackable without their knowledge.

He filmed his heist, and soon his video went viral on the Web, intensifying a debate over a push by government, federal and state, to put tracking technologies in identity documents and over their potential to erode privacy.

Putting a traceable RFID in every pocket has the potential to make everybody a blip on someone's radar screen, critics say, and to redefine Orwellian government snooping for the digital age.
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"Little Brother," some are already calling it - even though elements of the global surveillance web they warn against exist only on drawing boards, neither available nor approved for use.

But with advances in tracking technologies coming at an ever-faster rate, critics say, it won't be long before governments could be able to identify and track anyone in real time, 24-7, from a cafe in Paris to the shores of California.

On June 1, it became mandatory for Americans entering the United States by land or sea from Canada, Mexico, Bermuda and the Caribbean to present identity documents embedded with RFID tags, though conventional passports remain valid until they expire.

Among new options are the chipped "e-passport," and the new, electronic PASS card - credit-card sized, with the bearer's digital photograph and a chip that can be scanned through a pocket, backpack or purse from 30 feet.

Alternatively, travelers can use "enhanced" driver's licenses embedded with RFID tags now being issued in some border states: Washington, Vermont, Michigan and New York. Texas and Arizona have entered into agreements with the federal government to offer chipped licenses, and the U.S. Department of Homeland Security has recommended expansion to non-border states. Kansas and Florida officials have received DHS briefings on the licenses, agency records show.


continues at link:

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/conte...9071200705.html
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