Thread Rating:
  • 0 Vote(s) - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Letter From THE FUTURE
02-10-2008, 05:24 AM,
#1
Letter From THE FUTURE
Richard Heinberg


A LETTER FROM THE FUTURE

Greetings to you, people of the year 2001! You are living in the
year of my birth; I am one hundred years old now, writing to you from
the year 2101. I am using the last remnants of the advanced physics
that
scientists developed during your era, in order to send this electronic
message back in time to one of your computer networks. I hope that you
receive it, and that it will give you reason to pause and reflect on
your world and what actions to take with regard to it.

Of myself I shall say only what it is necessary to say: I am a
survivor. I have been extremely fortunate on many occasions and in many
ways, and I regard it as something of a miracle that I am here to
compose this message. I have spent much of my life attempting to pursue
the career of historian, but circumstances have compelled me also to
learn and practice the skills of farmer, forager, guerrilla fighter,
engineer - and now physicist. My life has been long and eventful . . .
but that is not what I have gone to so much trouble to convey to you.
It
is what I have witnessed during this past century that I feel compelled
to tell you by these extraordinary means.

You are living at the end of an era. Perhaps you cannot
understand that. I hope that, by the time you have finished reading
this
letter, you will.

I want to tell you what is important for you to know, but you
may find some of this information hard to absorb. Please have patience
with me. I am an old man and I don't have much time for niceties. If
what I say seems unbelievable, think of it as science fiction. But
please pay attention. The communication device I am using is quite
unstable and there's no telling how much of my story will actually get
through to you. Please pass it along to others. It will probably be the
only such message you will ever receive.

Since I don't know how much information I will actually be able
to convey, I'll start with the most important items, ones that will be
of greatest help in your understanding of where your world is headed.
Energy has been the central organizing - or should I say,
disorganizing?
- principle of this century. Actually, in historical retrospect, I
would
have to say that energy was the central organizing principle of the
nineteenth and twentieth centuries as well. People discovered new
energy
sources - coal, then petroleum - in the nineteenth century, and then
invented all sorts of new technologies to make use of this freshly
released energy. Transportation, manufacturing, agriculture, lighting,
heating - all were revolutionized, and the results reached deep into
the
lives of everyone in the industrialized world. Everybody became utterly
dependent on the new gadgets; on imported, chemically fertilized food;
on chemically synthesized and fossil-fuel-delivered therapeutic drugs;
on the very idea of perpetual growth (after all, it would always be
possible to produce more energy to fuel more transportation and
manufacturing - wouldn't it?). Well, if the nineteenth and twentieth
centuries were the upside of the growth curve, this past century has
been the downside - the cliff. It should have been perfectly obvious to
everyone that the energy sources on which they were coming to rely were
exhaustible. Somehow the thought never sank in very deep. I suppose
that's because people generally tend to get used to a certain way of
life, and from then on they don't think about it very much. That's true
today, too. The young people now have never known anything different;
they take for granted our way of life - scavenging among the remains of
industrial civilization for whatever can be put to immediate use - as
though this is how people have always lived, as if this is how we were
meant to live. That's why I've always been attracted to history, so
that
I could get some perspective on human societies as they change through
time. But I'm digressing. Where was I?

Yes - the energy crisis. Well, it all started around the time I
was born. Folks then thought it would be brief, that it was just a
political or technical problem, that soon everything would get back to
normal. They didn't stop to think that "normal," in the longer-term
historical sense, meant living on the energy budget of incoming
sunlight
and of the vegetative growth of the biosphere. Perversely, they thought
"normal" meant using fossil energy like there was no tomorrow. And, I
guess, there almost wasn't. That was a classic self-confirming
expectation - nearly.

At first, most people thought the shortages could be solved with
"technology." However, in retrospect that's quite ludicrous. After all,
their modern gadgetry had been invented to use a temporary abundance of
energy. It didn't produce energy. Yes, there were the nuclear reactors
(heavens, those things turned out to be nightmares!), but they cost so
much energy to build and decommission that the power they produced
during their lifetimes barely paid for them in energy terms. The same
with photovoltaic panels: it seems that nobody ever sat down and
calculated how much energy it actually took to manufacture them,
starting with the silicon wafers produced as byproducts of the computer
industry, and including the construction of the manufacturing plant
itself. It turned out that the making of the panels ate up nearly as
much power as the panels themselves generated duing their lifetime.
Nevertheless, quite a few of them were built - I wish that more had
been! - and many are still operating (that's what's powering the device
that allows me to transmit this signal to you from the future). Solar
power was a good idea; its main drawback was simply that it was
incapable of satisfying people's energy-guzzling habits. With the
exhaustion of fossil fuels, no technology could have maintained the way
of life that people had gotten used to. But it took quite a while for
many to realize that. Their pathetic faith in technology turned out to
be almost religious in character, as though their gadgets were votive
objects connecting them with an invisible but omnipotent god capable of
overturning the laws of thermodynamics.

Naturally, some of the first effects of the energy shortages
showed up as economic recessions, followed by an endless depression.
The
economists had been operating on the basis of their own religion - an
absolute, unshakable faith in the Market-as-God; in supply-and-demand.
They figured that if oil started to run out, the price would rise,
offering incentives for research into alternatives. But the economists
never bothered to think this through. If they had, they would have
realized that the revamping of society's entire energy infrastructure
would take decades, while the price signal from resource shortages
might
come only weeks or months before some hypothetical replacement would be
needed. Moreover, they should have realized that there was no
substitute
for basic energy resources.

The economists could think only in terms of money; basic
necessities like water and energy only showed up in their calculations
in terms of dollar cost, which made them functionally interchangeable
with everything else that was priceable - oranges, airliners, diamonds,
baseball cards, whatever. But, in the last analysis, basic resources
weren't interchangeable with other economic goods at all: you couldn't
drink baseball cards, no matter how big or valuable your collection,
once the water ran out. Nor could you eat dollars, if nobody had food
to
sell. And so, after a certain point, people started to lose faith in
their money. And as they did so, they realized that faith had been the
only thing that made money worth anything in the first place.
Currencies
just collapsed - first in one country, then in another. There was
inflation, deflation, barter, and thievery on every imaginable scale as
matters sorted themselves out.

In the era when I was born, commentators used to liken the
global economy to a casino. A few folks were making trillions of
dollars, euros, and yen trading in currencies, companies, and commodity
futures. None of these people were actually doing anything useful; they
were just laying down their bets and, in many cases, raking in colossal
winnings. If you followed the economic chain, you'd see that all of
that
money was coming out of ordinary people's pockets . . . but that's
another story. Anyway: all of that economic activity depended on
energy,
on global transportation and communication, and on faith in the
currencies. Early in the twenty-first century, the global casino went
bankrupt. Gradually, a new metaphor became operational. We went from
global casino to village flea market.

With less energy available each year, and with unstable
currencies plaguing transactions, manufacturing and transportation
shrank in scale. It didn't matter how little Nike paid its workers in
Indonesia: once shipping became prohibitively expensive, profits from
the globalization of its operations vanished. But Nike couldn't just
start up factories back in the States again; all of those factories had
been closed two decades earlier. The same with all the other clothing
manufacturers, electronics manufacturers, and so on. All of that local
manufacturing infrastructure had been destroyed to make way for
globalization, for cheaper goods, for bigger corporate profits. And
now,
to recreate that infrastructure would require a huge financial and
energy investment - just when money and energy were in ever shorter
supply.

Stores were empty. People were out of work. How were they to
survive? The only way they could do so was by endlessly recycling all
the used stuff that had been manufactured before the energy crisis. At
first, after the initial economic shock waves, people were selling
their
stuff on internet auctions - when there was electricity. Then, when it
became clear that lack of reliable transportation made delivery of the
goods problematic, people started selling stuff on street corners so
they could pay their rents and mortgages and buy food. But, after the
currency collapse, that didn't make sense either, so people began just
trading stuff, refurbishing it, using it however they could in order to
get by. The cruel irony was that most of their stuff consisted of cars
and electronic gadgets that nobody could afford to operate anymore.
Worthless! Anybody who had human-powered hand tools and knew how to use
them was wealthy indeed. And still is.

Industrial civilization sure produced a hell of a lot of junk
during its brief existence. Over the past fifty or sixty years, folks
have dug up just about every landfill there ever was, looking for
anything at all that could be useful. What a god-awful mess! With all
due respect, I have always had a hard time understanding why - and even
how - you people could take billions of tons of invaluable, ancient,
basic resources and turn them into mountains of stinking garbage, with
apparently almost no measurable period of practical use in between!
Couldn't you at least have made durable, well-designed stuff? I must
say
that the quality of the tools, furniture, houses, and so on that we
have
inherited from you - and are forced to use, given that few of us are
capable of replacing them - is pretty dismal.

Well, I apologize for those last remarks. I don't mean to be
nasty or rude. Actually some of the hand tools left behind are quite
good. But you have to understand: the industrial way of life to which
you have become accustomed will have horrific consequences for your
children and grandchildren. I can vaguely remember seeing - when I was
very young, maybe five or six - some old television shows from the
1950s: Ozzie and Harriet . . . Father Knows Best . . . Lassie. They
portrayed an innocent world, one in which children grew up in small
communities surrounded by friends and family. All problems were easily
dealt with by adults who were mostly kind and wise. It all seemed so
stable and benign.

When I was born, that world, if it had ever really existed, was
long gone. By the time I was old enough to know much about what was
happening on the bigger scene, society was beginning to come apart at
the seams. It started with electricity blackouts - just a few hours at
a
time at first. Then the natural gas shortages clicked in. Not only were
we cold most of the winter, but the blackouts got dramatically worse
because so much electricity was being produced using natural gas. And
then the oil and gasoline shortages hit. At this point - I guess I was
a
young teenager then - the economy was in tatters and there was
political
chaos.

By the time I was an older teenager, a certain identifiable
attitude was developing among the young people. It was a feeling of
utter contempt for anyone over a certain age - maybe thirty or forty.
The adults had consumed so many resources, and now there were none left
for their own children. Of course, when those adults were younger they
had just been doing what everybody else was doing. They figured it was
normal to cut down ancient forests for wood pulp for their phone books,
pump every last gallon of oil to power their SUVs, or flick on the air
conditioner if they were a little warm. For the kids of my generation,
all of that was just a dim memory. What we knew was very different. We
were living in darkness, with shortages of food and water, with riots
in
the streets, with people begging on street corners, with unpredictable
weather, with pollution and garbage that could no longer be carted away
and hidden from sight. For us, the adults were the enemy.

In some places, the age wars remained just a matter of simmering
resentment. In others, there were random attacks on older people. In
still others, there were systematic purges. I'm ashamed to say that,
while I didn't actually physically attack any older people, I did
participate in the shaming and name-calling. Those poor old folks -
some
of them still quite young, by my present perspective! - were just as
confused and betrayed as we kids were. I can imagine myself in their
shoes. Try to do the same: try to remember the last time you went to a
store to buy something and the store didn't have it. (This little
thought exercise is a real stretch for me, since I haven't been in a
"store" that actually had much of anything for several decades, but I'm
trying to put this in terms that you will understand.) Did you feel
frustrated? Did you get angry, thinking, "I drove all the way here for
this thing, and now I'm going to have to drive all the way across town
to another store to get it"? Well, multiply that frustration and anger
by a thousand, ten thousand. This is what people were going through
every day, with regard to just about every consumer item, service, or
bureaucratic necessity they had grown accustomed to. Moreover, those
adults had lost most of what they had in the economic crash. And now
gangs of kids were stealing whatever was left and heaping scorn on them
as they did so. That must have been devastating for them. Unbearable.

Now that I'm so ancient myself, I have a little more tolerance
for people. We're all just trying to get by, doing the best we can.

I suppose you're curious to know more about what has happened
during this past century - the politics, wars, revolutions. Well, I'll
tell you what I know, but there's a lot that I don't. For the last
sixty
years or so we haven't had anything like the global communications
networks that used to exist. There are large parts of the world about
which I know almost nothing. But I'll share what I can.

As you can imagine, when the energy resource shortages hit the
United States and the economy started to go into a tailspin (it's
interesting that I still use that word: only the oldest among us, such
as myself, have ever seen an airplane tailspin, nose-dive, or even
fly),
people became angry and started looking around for someone to blame. Of
course, the government didn't want to be the culprit, so those bastards
in power (sorry, I still don't have much sympathy for them) did what
political leaders have always done - they created a foreign enemy. They
sent warships, bombers, missiles, and tanks off across the oceans for
heaven knows what grisly purpose. People were told that this was being
done to protect their "American Way of Life." Well, there was nothing
on
Earth that could have accomplished that. It was the American Way of
Life
that was the problem!

The generals managed to kill a few million people. Actually, it
could have been tens or hundreds of millions for all I know; the news
media were never very clear on that, since they were censored by the
military. There were antiwar protests in the streets, and persecutions
of the antiwar protesters - some of whom were rounded up and put in
concentration camps. The government became utterly fascistic in its
methods toward the end. There were local uprisings and brutal
crackdowns. But it was all for nothing. The wars only depleted what few
resources were still available, and after five horrible years the
central government just collapsed. Ran out of gas.

Speaking of political events, it's worth noting that, in the
early years of the shortages, the existing political philosophies had
very little to offer that was helpful. The right-wingers were
completely
devoted to shielding the wealthy from blame and shifting all of the
pain
onto poor people and overseas scapegoats - the Arabs, North Koreans,
Mexicans, Indigenous People of America, Blacks, and
so on. Meanwhile, the Left was so habituated to fighting corporate
meanies that it couldn't grasp the fact that the problems now facing
society couldn't be solved by economic redistribution. Personally, as a
historian, I tend to be much more sympathetic to the Left because I
think that the accumulation of wealth that was occurring was just
obscene. I suspect that a hell of a lot of suffering could have been
averted if all of that wealth had been spread around early on, when the
money was worth something. But to hear some of the leftist leaders
talk,
you'd think that once all the corporations had been reined in, once the
billionaire plutocrats had been relieved of their riches, everything
would be fine. Well, everything wasn't going to be fine, no way.

So here were these two political factions fighting to the death,
blaming each other, while everybody around them was starving or going
crazy. What the people really needed was just some basic common-sense
information and advice, somebody to tell them the truth - that their
way
of life was coming to an end - and to offer them some sensible
collective survival strategies.

Much of what has happened during the past century was what you
have every reason to expect on the basis of your scientists' forecasts:
we have seen dramatic climate shifts, species extinctions, and horrible
epidemics, just as the ecologists at the turn of the last century
warned
there would be. I don't think that's a matter of much satisfaction to
those ecologists descendants. Getting to say "I told you so" is paltry
comfort in this situation. Tigers and whales are gone, and probably
tens
of thousands of other species; but our lack of reliable global
communications makes it difficult for anyone to know just which species
and where. For me, songbirds are a fond but distant memory. I suppose
my
counterparts in China or Africa have long lists. Climate change has
been
a real problem for growing food, and for just getting by. You never
know
from one year to the next what swarms of unfamiliar insects will show
up. For a year or two or three, all we get is rain. Then there's
drought
for the next five or six. It's much worse than a nuisance; it's
life-threatening. That's just one of the factors that has led to the
dramatic reduction in human population during this past century.

Many people call it "The Die-off." Others call it "The Pruning,"
"The Purification," or "The Cleansing." Some terms are more palatable
than others, but there really are no nice ways to describe the actual
events - the wars, epidemics, and famines.


Food and water have been big factors in all of this. Fresh,
clean water has been scarce for decades now. One way to make young
people mad at me is to tell them stories about how folks in the old
days
used to pour millions upon millions of gallons of water on their lawns.
When I describe to them how flush toilets worked, they just can't bear
it. Some of them 'm making this stuff up! These days water is serious
business. If you waste it, somebody's likely to die.

Starting many decades ago, people began - by necessity - to
learn how to grow their own food. Not everyone was successful, and
there
was a lot of hunger. One of the frustrating things was the lack of good
seeds. Very few people knew anything about saving seeds from one season
to the next, so existing seed stocks were depleted very quickly. There
was also a big problem with all the modern hybrid varieties: few of the
garden vegetables that were planted would produce good seeds for the
next year. The genetically engineering plants were even worse, causing
all sorts of ecological problems that we're still dealing with,
particularly the killing off of bees and other beneficial insects. The
seeds of good open-pollinated food plants are like gold to us.

I did some traveling by foot and on horseback when I was
younger, in my fifties and sixties, and we do get some reports from the
outside world. From what I've seen and heard, it seems that people in
different places have coped in different ways and with widely varying
degrees of success. Ironically, perhaps, the indigenous people who were
most persecuted by civilization are probably doing the best. They still
retained a lot of knowledge of how to live simply on the land. In some
places, people are dwelling together in makeshift rural communes; other
folks are trying to survive in what's left of the great urban centers,
ripping up concrete and growing what they can as they recycle and trade
all the old junk that was left behind when people fled the cities in
the
'twenties. As a historian, one of my biggest frustrations is the rapid
disappearance of knowledge. You people had a mania for putting most of
your important information on electronic storage media and acid-laden
paper - which are disintegrating very quickly. For the most part, all
we
have are fading photographs, random books, and crumbling magazines.

A few of our young people look at the old magazine ads and
wonder what it must have been like to live in a world with jet
airplanes, electricity, and sports cars. It must have been utopia,
paradise! Others among us are not so sanguine about the past. I suppose
that's part of my job as a historian: to remind everyone that the
advertising images were only one side of a story; it was the other side
of that story - the rampant exploitation of nature and people, the
blindness to consequences - that led to the horrors of the past
century.

You're probably wondering if I have any good news, anything
encouraging to say about the future of your world. Well, as with most
things, it depends on your perspective. Many of the survivors learned
valuable lessons. They learned what's important in life and what isn't.
They learned to treasure good soil, viable seeds, clean water,
unpolluted air, and friends you can count on. They learned how to take
charge of their own lives, rather than expecting to be taken care of by
some government or corporation. There are no "jobs" now, so people's
time is all their own. They think for themselves more. Partly as a
result of that, the old religions have largely fallen by the wayside,
and folks have rediscovered spirituality in nature and in their local
communities. The kids today are eager to learn and to create their own
culture. The traumas of industrial civilization's collapse are in the
past; that's history now. It's a new day.

Can you change the future? I don't know. There are all sorts of
logical contradictions inherent in that question. I can barely
understand the principles of physics that are allowing me to transmit
this signal to you. Possibly, as a result of reading this letter, you
might do something that would change my world. Maybe you could save a
forest or a species, or preserve some heirloom seeds, or help prepare
yourselves and the rest of the population for the coming energy
shortages. My life might be altered as a result. Then, I suppose this
letter would change, as would your experience of reading it. And as a
result of that, you'd take different actions. We would have set up some
kind of cosmic feedback loop between past and future. It's pretty
interesting to think about.

Speaking of physics, maybe I should mention that I've come to
accept a view of history based on what I've read about chaos theory.
According to the theory, in chaotic systems small changes in initial
conditions can lead to big changes in outcomes. Well, human society and
history are chaotic systems. Even though most of what people do is
determined by material circumstances, they still have some wiggle room,
and what they do with that can make a significant difference down the
line. In retrospect, it appears that human survival in the twenty-first
century hinged on many small and seemingly insignificant efforts by
marginalized individuals and groups in the twentieth century. The
anti-nuclear movement, the conservation movement, the anti-biotech
movement, the organic food and gardening movements, indigenous peoples'
resistance movements, the tiny organizations devoted to seed saving -
all had a profound and positive impact on later events.

I suppose that, logically speaking, if you were to alter the web
of causation leading up to my present existence, it is possible that
events might transpire that would preclude my being here. In that case,
this letter would constitute history's most bizarre suicide note! But
that is a risk I am willing to take. Do what you can. Change history!
And while you're at it, be kind to one another. Don't take anything or
anyone for granted.



If you wish to republish any of these essays or post them on a
web site, please contact rheinberg@museletter.com
<mailto:rheinberg@museletter.com?Subject=Re-publishing%20Information>
for permission.
Unite The Many, defeat the few.

Revolution is for the love of your people, culture, knowledge, wisdom, spirit, and peace. Not Greed!
Soul Rebel Native Son


http://video.google.ca/videoplay?docid=277...enous&hl=en
Reply
02-10-2008, 04:34 PM,
#2
Letter From THE FUTURE
:rofl:
Reply
02-10-2008, 06:42 PM,
#3
Letter From THE FUTURE
I don't think that's funny. It's one of the paths our future could take, and it's a very real possibility.
One day Chuang Tzu and a friend were walking by a river. &Look at the fish
swimming about,& said Chuang Tzu, &They are really enjoying themselves.&

&You are not a fish,& replied the friend, &So you can't truly know that they
are enjoying themselves.&

&You are not me,& said Chuang Tzu. &So how do you know that I do not
know that the fish are enjoying themselves?&
Reply
02-10-2008, 08:21 PM, (This post was last modified: 02-10-2008, 08:24 PM by mexika.)
#4
Letter From THE FUTURE
The signs are there.

I remember watching this movie, forgot the name of it. But it was set in the future. Water was scarce, food was scarce, fall out radiation had killed plant life to some extent and distorted human body forms. People would just walk or hide aimlessly from humans who would raid those who could not defend themselves. It was the wild wild west again, but this time, the guns were lasers and people would scavenge what ever they could to survive, others hide and die as their time came came. Groups would form or band together for survival and those who showed no mercy would better off than those were alone to fend for themselves and from prey, survival of the of the ugliest and most devil were the ones who enjoyed what was left behind. Not that they were the ones who would out survive anybody else. I can not remember the movie, maybe someone will.

In Los Angeles, there was a farm, full of fruits, vegetation, trees, medicinal plants. It was located in the middle of the city, South Central of the city. You could see it from space, it was a whole block of nothing but greenery and some Jew, a corporate jew, with the help of the city politicians the the police state had it torn away with machines, guns, and greed. They even cut the last tallest tree standing. Our government deprived the city of good producing oxygen and organic plantation for the city, the last of its kind. This garden was constructed with the hands and by the hands of the Mexicans, Central Americans, and others. Many people from around the city came to see this marvelous garden and when it was attacked the city was deprived of organic fruits and vegetables as well as nothing but pure oxygen. It seems NOW, like the government have resorted to the destruction of the cultivation of good farming, and the annihilation of good healthy human beings in the city and else where in the world. This farm was called 'THE SOUTH CENTRAL FARM' in Los Angeles, destroyed by a CORPORATE JEW WITH THE HELP OF THE POLITICIANS AND THE POLICE STATE. What will the children think? What example has the government, the state shown to the children of the future? That it is wrong to plant life, it is better to destroy it and have the corporations run it all? What is wrong with the United Snakes Government and City Police States? What is wrong with KKK government in the white house - We best be dressing up with combat boots and gearing up because the state has determined that the people are cattle and have been deemed not only consumers of corporate greed but enemies of the state.

[Image: _mg_1414.jpgmid.jpg]






[Image: 250px-South_Central_Farm_NASA_1.png]






Link to farm:
http://www.southcentralfarmers.com/

wikipedia:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/South_Central_Farm
Unite The Many, defeat the few.

Revolution is for the love of your people, culture, knowledge, wisdom, spirit, and peace. Not Greed!
Soul Rebel Native Son


http://video.google.ca/videoplay?docid=277...enous&hl=en
Reply
02-10-2008, 08:24 PM,
#5
Letter From THE FUTURE
Quote:I don't think that's funny. It's one of the paths our future could take, and it's a very real possibility.


Funny,... the jist of the message isn't per se, but claiming to be from the future is.
I saw the letter as greenie propaganda, and the age wars reminded me of that old TV show Logan's Run.
Reply
02-10-2008, 08:53 PM,
#6
Letter From THE FUTURE
Quote:Funny,... the jist of the message isn't per se, but claiming to be from the future is.
I think it was used as an artistic tool for text to be more enjoyable. If author claims it's really from future then it's laughable, yes;)
One day Chuang Tzu and a friend were walking by a river. &Look at the fish
swimming about,& said Chuang Tzu, &They are really enjoying themselves.&

&You are not a fish,& replied the friend, &So you can't truly know that they
are enjoying themselves.&

&You are not me,& said Chuang Tzu. &So how do you know that I do not
know that the fish are enjoying themselves?&
Reply
02-11-2008, 04:30 AM,
#7
Letter From THE FUTURE
Its encoded in that way because most people read the first sentence and toss it away. It is a real scenario that is taking place in Africa where you actually need a card to acquire water from the water plumbing. Water should never be sold, it is life. What is happening is that corporations and capitalism is infecting the world with cancer, enslavement, and utter disregard for peace, earth, and a future. What we see in Africa, what we see in Amerikkka, in Latin Indigenous Native America, and what is taking place in the middle east is diabolical from a nightmare movie conducted by some greedy zionist jew in Hollywood. Think if they did it with 911, a devilish plan to wipe off 3000 people or more, they can probably take down/exterminate one million, oh wait, they have already done in in IRAQ! The congo where 4500 Congolese People are being exterminated by European and Amerikkkan corporations each and every day - If we step back and look at the earth from afar in space - we can see a f---k-g living hell created by some really wicked entity as skull and bone bush and his satanic family of demons and others who show no actual remorse for life, liberty, and peace. Next coming elections of the new president could very well be Hillary the witch whore form hell coming to fulfill the last blitzkrieg of their loving father, Hitler.

Its a nightmare in other nations. But to fulfill the last take over, other nations have to be put on check before coming to the so called Amerikkkan nation and enslave everyone in the place called democracy. If you go to Mexico, Canada, or any other place, it will be the same. First other nations, than Amerikkka as the first so called democracy and the last so called democracy - want freedom - better scream fast and loud because our ancestors prophecies tell of a dark age of pure evil and darkness.

Clean your soul now. because if you encounter the dark cleansing without your soul, mind, and body in good state hood, chances are you will not survive. All greedy people will be the first to be shot, followed by the haters, the genocidal and others who only feel themselves and no one else. People who want to make a difference and have peace, the earth will favor. All others will simply cease to be one with all of those who wish a better place for you and your offspring.

Peace X
Unite The Many, defeat the few.

Revolution is for the love of your people, culture, knowledge, wisdom, spirit, and peace. Not Greed!
Soul Rebel Native Son


http://video.google.ca/videoplay?docid=277...enous&hl=en
Reply
02-11-2008, 01:31 PM,
#8
Letter From THE FUTURE
Quote:All greedy people will be the first to be shot, followed by the haters, the genocidal and others who only feel themselves and no one else.
And who will shoot them? How will he know if the person's heart is greedy?:dazed:
One day Chuang Tzu and a friend were walking by a river. &Look at the fish
swimming about,& said Chuang Tzu, &They are really enjoying themselves.&

&You are not a fish,& replied the friend, &So you can't truly know that they
are enjoying themselves.&

&You are not me,& said Chuang Tzu. &So how do you know that I do not
know that the fish are enjoying themselves?&
Reply
02-29-2008, 03:56 PM,
#9
Letter From THE FUTURE
This is the one scenario most of us cant stomach. YOU will be first up against the wall. We the people of earth are to be taken out. Machines do most of our work for us. This means that we are less required by TPTB. All our demands for "rights" has made out masters are angry at us. We will be punished in the end. The day of judgment is apon us. It will be us who are judged by them. Get in line slave.
Reply
02-29-2008, 06:42 PM,
#10
Letter From THE FUTURE
Quote:YOU will be first up against the wall.
First against the wall will be residents of so called "third world"... Well, they already are.
One day Chuang Tzu and a friend were walking by a river. &Look at the fish
swimming about,& said Chuang Tzu, &They are really enjoying themselves.&

&You are not a fish,& replied the friend, &So you can't truly know that they
are enjoying themselves.&

&You are not me,& said Chuang Tzu. &So how do you know that I do not
know that the fish are enjoying themselves?&
Reply
03-08-2008, 07:40 AM,
#11
Letter From THE FUTURE
Quote:This is the one scenario most of us cant stomach. YOU will be first up against the wall. We the people of earth are to be taken out. Machines do most of our work for us. This means that we are less required by TPTB. All our demands for "rights" has made out masters are angry at us. We will be punished in the end. The day of judgment is apon us. It will be us who are judged by them. Get in line slave.


After you.....

If you consider yourself a slave!!!


Or who do you consider a slave?
Unite The Many, defeat the few.

Revolution is for the love of your people, culture, knowledge, wisdom, spirit, and peace. Not Greed!
Soul Rebel Native Son


http://video.google.ca/videoplay?docid=277...enous&hl=en
Reply
03-08-2008, 07:43 AM,
#12
Letter From THE FUTURE
Quote:
Quote:YOU will be first up against the wall.
First against the wall will be residents of so called "third world"... Well, they already are.


We will see about that....

So far, As native American or True Native of Turtle Island..... America never succeeded and it will never will...

And unfortunately - War against the Indians continues - That just goes to show you who the savages are!!
Unite The Many, defeat the few.

Revolution is for the love of your people, culture, knowledge, wisdom, spirit, and peace. Not Greed!
Soul Rebel Native Son


http://video.google.ca/videoplay?docid=277...enous&hl=en
Reply
03-08-2008, 07:43 AM,
#13
Letter From THE FUTURE
Quote:
Quote:YOU will be first up against the wall.
First against the wall will be residents of so called "third world"... Well, they already are.


We will see about that....

So far, As native American or True Native of Turtle Island..... America never succeeded and it will never will...

And unfortunately - War against the Indians continues - That just goes to show you who the savages are!!
Unite The Many, defeat the few.

Revolution is for the love of your people, culture, knowledge, wisdom, spirit, and peace. Not Greed!
Soul Rebel Native Son


http://video.google.ca/videoplay?docid=277...enous&hl=en
Reply
03-09-2008, 02:59 AM,
#14
Letter From THE FUTURE
Time can not be passed but one way.

Its a one way street.

Time is always going forward.
Reply
03-10-2008, 03:04 AM,
#15
Letter From THE FUTURE
http://www.worldometers.info/

http://www.poodwaddle.com/clocks2.htm
Marc "TheQleaner" Fisher
Unseen Head
The Illuminati Order

Novus Ordo Seclorum
Reply


Possibly Related Threads...
Thread Author Replies Views Last Post
  Army of the future: Soldiers to run at Olympic speed won't need food or sleep TriWooOx 0 575 08-12-2012, 02:41 PM
Last Post: TriWooOx
  Brain Scans 'To Predict Future Criminals' TriWooOx 5 2,800 03-14-2012, 02:48 AM
Last Post: FastTadpole
  Crop Circles: Messages From the Future? Solve et Coagula 2 1,093 02-05-2011, 10:07 AM
Last Post: rsol
Video Data Vizualization - Life of the Future: Visions of 2020 FastTadpole 0 1,041 06-05-2010, 10:21 AM
Last Post: FastTadpole
  Russia's 'fracked' future --- 0 608 02-01-2010, 08:29 PM
Last Post: ---
  We have seen the future, and it doesn't belong to you h3rm35 0 810 01-13-2010, 02:56 AM
Last Post: h3rm35
  A.I. Anchors Replace Human Reporters In Newsroom of the Future April 1 808 12-02-2009, 11:50 PM
Last Post: Easy Skanking
  Popular Science The Future of.. FastTadpole 0 754 09-16-2009, 05:08 AM
Last Post: FastTadpole
  Growing New Organs is Not the Futureā€¦it is Happening Today! --- 4 1,147 05-11-2009, 09:12 PM
Last Post: mastermg
  The First GM Human Embryo Could Dramatically Alter the Future --- 1 694 03-30-2009, 06:32 AM
Last Post: mmstick

Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)