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The G20 Debacle: The largest Police Mobilization in Canada's History.
07-03-2010, 04:10 AM, (This post was last modified: 07-03-2010, 04:13 AM by itsaname.)
#1
The G20 Debacle: The largest Police Mobilization in Canada's History.
.
What it Might Have Looked Like Inside the Fence

Hosting the G20 in Toronto was the first of a series of political gambles by the Conservative Canadian government led by Prime Minister Stephen Harper. At a time when U.S. President Barack Obama, leader of the world's greatest debtor nation, was seeking additional stimulus money and therefore deficit financing (something the previous regime of George W. Bush was no stranger to), Harper's Conservative Finance Minister and delegate to the G20, Jim Flaherty, was advocating austerity. Flaherty, who was Finance Minister for the province of Ontario in the late 1990s, introduced to Canada's biggest and wealthiest province what the poor countries had come to know as neoliberalism – shrinking public finances through tax cuts and spending cuts, privatization of public services, and the ideological use of the fear of 'deficits' to justify it all. No matter that Flaherty left Ontario's finances in an abysmal state, far worse than he found them, with higher deficits and debts. Ontario's “Common Sense Revolution” had accomplished other tasks: it had devastated the public sector and the social safety net, harmed the unions, thrown thousands more people out of their homes to live on the streets. To deal with the resistance generated by the unpopularity of these policies, the government boosted police budgets and police powers, meeting demonstrations with riot police and beatings.

Bodies like the G8 and Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) are generally like minded, as they represent the minority of countries that are already wealthy. These countries have an interest in the current order, skewed as it is toward their interests. Until recently, they have had the power to keep things that way. But when what was then called the Asian economic crisis struck in the late 1990s, the wealthy countries let the biggest of the poor countries into a new club, the G20 Finance Ministers meeting. The new body could claim to be more inclusive: with China, India, Indonesia, and Brazil aboard, the G20 had the Finance Ministers of 80% of the world's population and 80% of the world's GDP. But as an informal gathering of Finance Ministers (Labour Ministers started to meet at separate summits years later), without any transparent structure, and whose debates took place away from the public eye, the gatherings were still suspect. Norway's Foreign Minister recently called the G20 “the greatest setback since World War II,” “a grouping without international legitimacy,” with “no mandate.” The skewed membership and structure hides skewed power relations within the G20, where the G8 countries have far more say in how the world is going to be governed.

Because the lowest common denominator for countries with such vastly different problems and agendas is low indeed, the G20 meetings produce declarations of principle that are mostly platitudes. It is difficult to argue that they have done much, in their 11 years of existence, to stabilize economies, much less to deal with any of the other issues for which sound thinking about global finance is needed, from food and fuel system problems, development aid and war to environmental degradation and climate change.

This year's declaration features platitudes, certainly, but also signs that Obama's (probably half-hearted) desire for additional stimulus was defeated. The desire for stimulus was echoed by countries like India, whose growth is based on exports to the West and foreign direct investment from the West (which currently takes the form of giving away huge tracts of land and resources to multinationals). But other Western countries, and especially Europe, have to pass the crisis on to their populations or risk losing their position in the global economic hierarchy. This is where Canada's proposals, and Flaherty's proposals in particular, come into play.

What Flaherty called “Common Sense Revolution” in Ontario in the 1990s is called “fiscal consolidation” in the summit declaration. The declaration concedes that “sustaining the recovery is key,” but counterposes this with “the importance of sustainable public finances.” The enemy, once called “deficits,” is now recast, perhaps because environmentalism made it a bad word, as “unsustainable public finances.” The magic word “consolidation,” which means attacking deficits, occurs 19 times in the 27 page declaration. Consolidation is to be “growth friendly,” but it must happen. Canada worked hard to dilute any talk of financial sector regulation, and the declaration's discussion of regulation is unsubstantial – promises of “strong measures to improve transparency and improve regulatory oversight.”

Another pillar of the G20 declaration is an absolute commitment to fight protectionism. Although every single member of the club of wealthy countries got there through protectionism, the G20, like the WTO, the IMF, and World Bank, remains wedded to “free trade” doctrine. The G20 countries are applauded for not trying to protect their economies from the crisis through tariffs.

Consolidation and free trade, which serve the western members of the G20 better than its big, poor members, are the substantial commitments of the declaration. Both sets of policies have proven immensely unpopular where they have been imposed. To defend them, like defending the summits, governments have turned to police forces and fear.

Beyond consolidation and free trade, the declaration contains well-intentioned but empty platitudes. A non-exhaustive list:

* Standing with the people of Haiti – while refusing to provide them nearly enough resources to recover from the earthquake, which would take a tiny fraction of what was spent helping the banks through their crisis.

* A commitment to Copenhagen's toothless climate change protocols – for “those of us who have associated ourselves with the Copenhagen Accord.” Interestingly, “those of us” so associated look forward to “the outcome of the UN Secretary-General’s High-Level Advisory Group on Climate Change Financing which is, inter alia, exploring innovative financing.” Was that an unintentional slip, an admission that any innovative financing will probably have to come from outside the G20?

* A recognition of the need to share “best practices” after the Gulf of Mexico oil spill – talk of a moratorium on offshore drilling or any other such drastic measures is too much for the G20. A major coastal ecosystem, fishery, and food source can be destroyed; major banks have to be saved.

* $224-million in development grants for agriculture in Bangladesh, Rwanda, Haiti, Togo, and Sierra Leone. This highly generous sum amounts to about 1/5 of what was spent on security for the summit itself.

Given the bizarre billion-dollar price tag – a price tag that assumes that the citizenry is so boggled by large numbers that it can't smell when something awful is cooking – the declaration cost about $37-million per page.

The spectacle of these finance ministers meeting to talk about passing on the costs of their economic crises on to their citizens has produced opposition, and large protests, wherever they were held. As the host of the summit, Harper had the choice of where to locate it. The financial capital of the country, Toronto, was a natural choice. But a major city meant a major protest. The city's mayor, David Miller, suggested a contained area frequently used for conferences and meetings, Exhibition Place. Harper opted to hold the meeting in the downtown core, contain it with a multimillion dollar fence, and commence what might have been the largest police mobilization in the country's history.

And the View From Outside the Fence

In the weeks leading up to the summit, the media was full of fearmongering. A Toronto Star “Survival Guide” advised staying calm around the police, and explaining to them whatever they wanted. A police official went a step further, in an unusual usurpation of authority by police to tell citizens what to do and where to go: “don't come.” Security for such summits had in the past, at the highest level in Pittsburgh, run as high as $100-million. What was the $1-billion paying for? Some of it went to new, and lasting, police infrastructure: new water cannons, new sound weapons, new surveillance cameras, an array of nonlethal weapons intended to disrupt protests. The training, communications, and command systems would cost more. The overtime pay for the thousands of out-of-town police would cost still more. But $1-billion? No one believed there was any credible threat to the safety of the G20 officials. At worst, protesters might have smashed some windows, as they had in some previous global summits like the WTO protest in Montreal in 2005. Could smashed windows, or any conspiracy to smash windows, justify $1-billion in security expenditure? Could it justify the various changes to the law and emergency police powers that were put in place? The open question represented a political risk for Harper: if the protesters succeeded in capturing the agenda or disrupting the summit, Harper could lose some of his law-and-order reputation. If Harper's police went too far, they might risk a backlash from the public, who have so far been very forgiving of Harper.

In the event, the police forces took no chances, and quite probably took matters into their own hands. When the big march (well over 10,000 by my count, 25,000 by some counts) failed to pass police lines (given that about an equal number of police, 19,000 or 20,000, were deployed), and continued, a group of protesters doubled back before turning south toward the fence. Some of these covered their faces and, after they'd left the big march, smashed windows and police cars. While deep police lines backed by horses had prevented the big march from heading south to the fence, a gap appeared and a group of protesters was somehow allowed to head several blocks south before being stopped. At the southernmost location, Bay and King, a police car was somehow set on fire, although some eyewitnesses say there were almost no protesters around and also, mysteriously, no uniformed police. The role of police provocateurs in these events might eventually come out in court, to which I will return.

The point here is that at least through a passive decision, and more likely through active provocation, the police helped see to it that windows and police cars were destroyed. Journalist Joe Wenkoff followed the Black Bloc for 27 blocks without any police presence. A police source told Toronto Sun reporter Joe Warmington that the police had orders to let it happen: “there were guys with equipment to do the job, all standing around looking at each other in disbelief.”

Almost no one was arrested during the smashing. Before the demonstration took place, police seized activists and organizers in raids – some of whom are still being held at detention centres. The (Saturday, June 26) night after the afternoon demonstration and the day after (Sunday, June 27), however, police rounded up hundreds of people – some 1,000 in total (which means $1-million security expenditure per arrested protester). Curiously, police had announced prior to the summit that they expected to arrest 1,000. Did they simply keep arresting until they met their numbers? Given the “catch and release” policy they followed (100 of the 1000 are still in detention, and many of those released have given shocking testimonies of abuse by police, outdoor cages, open toilets, denial of feminine products to prisoners) it seems likely.

People on Toronto streets reported seeing police operations that had no relationship to any protest or anything going on: riot police shuffling about, horse charges, rapid deployment from one part of the city to another, temporary closures of areas and sweeping up of random people into mass arrests. It looked to me like Harper's people were flexing their muscles, testing the public stomach, seeing how far they could ride over people's rights and liberties. Accompanying the show of muscle was a public relations effort – placing the burden of justifying the $1-billion security expenditure on some smashed windows and police cars (with damages probably in the tens of thousands).

Something of a public backlash did emerge. On Monday afternoon, 2600 people (by my count) protested the police response outside headquarters. Among the slogans: “No more cops on overtime, protesting is not a crime.” The same police who had been so abusive the day before were relatively quiet. Protesters didn't see any riot gear, the bike police didn't push people with their bikes as they often do at protests, and the horses stayed largely out of sight a block away.

Important questions remain about the dozens that remain in detention. Will the government pursue charges and seek jail sentences for protesters? If some of those who smashed windows were entrapped by provocateurs, will the evidence emerge in trial? Will the public allow the state to persecute protesters when the police role was so pernicious? And the question that, unfortunately, is likely to get lost in the details: since these summits are destructive when they are not useless, are they worth spending hundreds of millions of dollars, shutting down cities, destroying civil liberties? •

_________________________________________________________

Toronto Call: No More Police State Tactics

Below is a statement that you are being asked to sign. We believe it is urgent to get as many signatures on a call for a public inquiry. We believe it is possible to shift the terms to debate, and to shine a spotlight on the abusive police practices during the G8/G20. But we need your help to do that.

Please sign on and circulate the call widely to friends, colleagues, allies and networks who might be willing to sign.

Email TheTorontoCall@gmail.com with your name, affiliation and which category you prefer to be placed in (trade unionists, faculty, students, community activists, legal workers, teachers, cultural workers, arrested and detained).

....statement available on rabble.ca.

SOURCE: by Justin Podur Global Research Article

http://www.globalresearch.ca/index.php?context=va&aid=20000
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07-03-2010, 03:05 PM,
#2
RE: The G20 Debacle: The largest Police Mobilization in Canada's History.
Or/and you could sign this:



The actions of the government and the police during the G20 Summit demonstrate the need for answers, accountability, and action. The Canadian Civil Liberties Association (CCLA) is calling for:

1) An independent inquiry into the actions of the police during the G20, including:

* The dispersal of protestors at the designated demonstration site in Queen’s Park late afternoon, Saturday June 26th;
* The detention and mass arrest on the Esplanade on the night of Saturday, June 26th;
* The arrests and police actions outside the Eastern Ave. detention centre on the morning of Sunday, June 27th;
* The prolonged detention and mass arrest of individuals at Queen St. W. and Spadina Ave. on the evening of Sunday, June 27th;
* The conditions of detention at the Eastern Ave. detention centre;

2) Repeal or amendment of the Public Works Protection Act to meet basic constitutional standards; and

3) Law reform to ensure that the Criminal Code provisions relating to “breach of the peace”, “unlawful assemblies” and “riots” are brought in line with constitutional standards.

If you share our concerns and want your voice to be heard, send your name and email address to us at g20petition@ccla.org. We will add your name to our list and, when we have 5,000 signatures, forward it to the federal and provincial governments.
An error does not become truth by reason of multiplied propagation, nor does truth become error because nobody sees it.
Mohandas Gandhi


Each of us is put here in this time and this place to personally decide the future of humankind.
Did you think you were put here for something less?
Chief Arvol Looking Horse
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07-03-2010, 07:53 PM,
#3
RE: The G20 Debacle: The largest Police Mobilization in Canada's History.
@itsaname
Thanks for the link to the G20 Toronto Summit Declaration it's an interesting skim of warm and fuzzy talk about socialism and free trade spattered with world currency, bank nationalization and new reserve currency undertones. I'm glad that you posted something about the actual happenings, as opaque as it was, behind closed doors with the most prominent puppets in the world in attendance... and maybe their masters beamed, tunnelled or teleconferencing to tell them how to act and think or maybe a pep talk.



Dugg: Sign the CCLA's Petition for Action on the G20!

So I sent this email for posterity and will be CCing it to all of the MPs and senators with a little an opinion or two. Maybe someone in parliament will grow some nards -- maybe they'll even be perceptive enough to realize that they're subject to this tyranny as well once their apparent usefulness has past its expiry date and join the rest of the herd and fodder.

Quote:It may have been "legal" (in the context of the Public Works Protection Act) but it is morally and intrinsically wrong to give or obey orders of the nature that were carried out against both Canadian citizens and our foreign guests. This law needs to be amended or repealed. The dehumanizing mistreatment of Amy Miller, the drummed up charges on Charlie Veitch to name only a couple of the hundreds of people subjected to abusive and overbearing action by peace officers, riot control personnel and those who permitted, suggested or commanded this conduct. The collective actions do not reflect the wishes, morals or values that I hold dear and for that you have lost what was left of my confidence and respect for your ability to represent me and my family.

You do have an opportunity to win some of it back by your acknowledgement and actions based on the following unified statement on behalf of the CCLA, the rest of the people that will be sending these demands in the coming weeks and myself:

The actions of the government and the police during the G20 Summit demonstrate the need for answers, accountability, and action. The Canadian Civil Liberties Association (CCLA) is calling for:

1) An independent inquiry into the actions of the police during the G20, including:

* The dispersal of protestors at the designated demonstration site in Queen’s Park late afternoon, Saturday June 26th;
* The detention and mass arrest on the Esplanade on the night of Saturday, June 26th;
* The arrests and police actions outside the Eastern Ave. detention centre on the morning of Sunday, June 27th;
* The prolonged detention and mass arrest of individuals at Queen St. W. and Spadina Ave. on the evening of Sunday, June 27th;
* The conditions of detention at the Eastern Ave. detention centre;

2) Repeal or amendment of the Public Works Protection Act to meet basic constitutional standards; and

3) Law reform to ensure that the Criminal Code provisions relating to “breach of the peace”, “unlawful assemblies” and “riots” are brought in line with constitutional standards.


Thank you in advance for doing the moral and just action representative of the citizens (the rightful leadership) of Canada in accepting and working towards properly representing the will of the people in adherence with all of the above requests.
There are no others, there is only us.
http://FastTadpole.com/
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07-08-2010, 11:40 PM,
#4
RE: The G20 Debacle: The largest Police Mobilization in Canada's History.
Police State Canada

http://vimeo.com/13097041
edit: embed fail

Nicely done compilation. Don't like it? At the very least please send an email for posterity. Over 2500 signatures, we're halfway there. Who knows they might call for a whitewash investigation and at least bring more attention to the debacle. Don't let their sacrifice be for nothing.

http://ccla.org/2010/06/30/sign-the-cclas-petition-for-action-on-the-g20/
There are no others, there is only us.
http://FastTadpole.com/
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07-28-2010, 04:36 AM,
#5
RE: The G20 Debacle: The largest Police Mobilization in Canada's History.
More on the legal front ..

Quote:G20 activist released on $140,000 bail with extreme conditions
by Justin Saunders

One of the three G20 arrestees remaining in custody has been released from a courtroom in North Toronto tonight, after more than a month in prison.

Amanda Hiscocks, a community organizer in Guelph, is among 17 people facing conspiracy charges stemming from the police crackdown on G20 dissent. She and several other prominent activists were pre-emptively detained in violent, early morning raids on several Toronto homes prior to the demonstrations on June 26th.

She was released on bail totalling $140,000 and has been placed under house arrest with family in Ottawa until trial.

As part of the conditions of her release, Hiscocks is under strict surveillance by her sureties and police, is not allowed access to a cell phone, pager or any other device with wireless connectivity, cannot organize, plan or attend public demonstrations (a breach of her charter rights), have contact with her co-accused or associate with anyone who is a part of No One Is Illegal (NOII), Anti-War at Laurier or the Southern Ontario Anarchist Resistance (SOAR).

The details of the proceedings have been placed under a publication ban.
http://toronto.mediacoop.ca/story/g20-activist-released-140000-bail-extreme-conditions/4306
To keep posted on the CCLA action and some good feeds on current developments. See their G8/G20 Section at http://ccla.org/our-work/current-issues/g8-and-g20/
There are no others, there is only us.
http://FastTadpole.com/
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08-17-2010, 06:31 AM,
#6
RE: The G20 Debacle: The largest Police Mobilization in Canada's History.
I didn't want to start a new thread but here's a related torrent.

The Miami Model (2003 FTAA Miami protests)
http://concen.org/tracker/torrents-details.php?id=19038

Quote:The Miami model
The Miami model refers to the distinctive features of crowd control technique used in Miami, which included large scale pre-emptive arrests, heavily armed sometimes unidentifiable law enforcement, the collection of intelligence from protesters, and the "embedding" of corporate media with the police.[2] Additionally, areas that are to be the site of a major event are given large federal grants to purchase materials for security. Thus, police may be unfamiliar with the use of the new equipment they have been given and rural police brought in to the city may be somewhat unfamiliar with crowd control tactics in general. Protestors and activists allege some of the following[3] as further tactics belonging to the Miami model:

* Establishment of joint, unified, multi-agency command/control network.
* Mass purchase of surveillance equipment, riot gear and other supplies.
* Training of local law enforcement in "crowd control tactics" and less lethal weapons.
* Public relations, "information warfare", newspeak/spin:
o "terrorists/violent protesters coming" vs "well trained officers".
o "event meaningful target for terrorism."
o "police will protect the right to protest."
o "anarchists and criminal elements", dramatic Seattle WTO or London imagery.
o display of confiscated "weapons" prove malintent.
o "unpermitted protests can continue" due to police good will.
o independent media targeted, cameras, video confiscated.
* Pro-event/anti-demonstrator promotional tools developed/used in community.
* Reluctant officials, civic groups pressured to comply with plan by Secret Service/DHS.
* Locations strategically valuable to protesters reserved by law enforcement.
* Plans to secure public buildings and strategic private businesses complete.
* Anti-protest ordinances and other legal hurdles to prevent lawful assembly begin.
* State of Emergency declared or Executive Order signed to allow military policing.
* Surveillance and disruption of protest organizers begins.
* Attempts to divide protest groups and organizers begins in media and meetings.
* Court system tied up: regular business delayed during protest; assist mass arrests.
* Mass detention facilities identified and prepped for use.
* Civic groups and clubs employed to support law enforcement activities.
* March and event permits denied or delayed; delay tactics.
* Police/military collaborate with media, ie. embedded reporters, etc.
* Street level surveillance increases on organizers and demonstrators.
* Public training drills and mass show of force.
* Sporadic harassment, detention and arrest of demonstrators traveling in area.
* Disruption of organizing/assembly/housing/media spaces. Possible preemptive arrest.
* Command Center operational; large undercover teams begin reporting
* Militarized "hard zone" and limited access "soft zone" created with fences, barricades.
* Area wide surveillance video, including 3-D video systems operational.
* Field forces (riot police, bike police, checkpoints, etc.) put into place.
* Day of protest: assembly blocked, obstructed, redirected.
* Use of less-lethal weapons - projectiles, chemical weapons, electric weapons, sound devices etc.
* Streets cleared using force; protesters pursued; more mass arrest.
* Jail solidarity events allowed to protest for few hours, then cleared.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Miami_model
There are no others, there is only us.
http://FastTadpole.com/
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09-08-2010, 04:23 AM,
#7
RE: The G20 Debacle: The largest Police Mobilization in Canada's History.
Update on the G20 Arrests and Civil Action against the MIC. Apparently it is being neutered or at least not all it could be citing intimidation and fear.

Quote:CCLA vexed over police records for G20 detainees
By Tim Naumetz | Publication Date: Tuesday, 07 September 2010

OTTAWA — More than 150 people who say they were wrongfully arrested during the G20 summit protests only to be released without being charged are too fearful of police retaliation to take part in formal complaints by the Canadian Civil Liberties Association, the organization’s senior lawyer says.

As well, in another potentially disturbing aspect of the largest mass arrest in Canada’s history, the more than 800 protesters who were arrested and detained but released without charges face the prospect of an internal police record and no avenue for erasing it, CCLA general counsel Nathalie Des Rosiers tells Law Times.

Des Rosiers says the association came upon the unsettling effects of police reaction to crowds of thousands of demonstrators as it was preparing a formal complaint to Ontario’s Office of the Independent Police Review Director.

Of the approximately 300 people who were arrested and released and later contacted the CCLA about their concerns, roughly half declined to take part in the complaint.

“They were afraid, afraid that would leave a black mark and they would be subject to some police harassment if they did that,” Des Rosiers says. “So people are afraid of the police and are worried, and it does have a chilling effect on their ability to exercise their democratic rights.”

Des Rosiers disclosed the concerns while discussing a hard-hitting report the association released on the two-month anniversary of the protests and police actions. It contains the harshest criticism the CCLA has made yet about the behaviour of police and the tactics they used.

On top of the protesters who were too fearful to file complaints and the hundreds who will have their arrests logged in Toronto Police Service computer files, many of the roughly 300 protesters who eventually arrived at what was essentially a mass court appearance in Toronto two weeks ago say they faced pressure to settle their charges with charitable donations in order to avoid the cost and difficulty of proving their innocence through lengthy court proceedings.

“The dilemma of the people who have done nothing wrong is, are they going to be subject to a criminal shadow — some say it will be two years before all the trials are done — or do you want to just settle it right now with a charitable donation?” Des Rosiers says.

She notes the prospect of police records for the hundreds who were arrested and released without charge is among the issues the association wants to address over and above the complaint to the independent review office.

“That’s a fairly unsavoury aspect of the whole process to have the police keep information about you, about having been arrested even if the charges are dropped,” Des Rosiers
says. “If you’re 21 or 22 years old, who knows how this information will be treated or understood 20 years from now?”

A spokesman for the Toronto police confirmed that the names of those arrested and released are logged in an “occurrence” database that officers may access.

Nevertheless, he notes the majority of protesters were held for breach of peace, an offence for which authorities don’t release records during employment checks. “Anybody concerned about employment records, that would not be released,” Mark Pugash tells Law Times.

However, Des Rosiers and two of the Toronto lawyers behind two class actions launched against the Toronto Police Services Board, the federal attorney general, and, in one of the lawsuits, the Peel Police Services Board, note the insidious potential of informal police databases separate from the Canadian Police Information Centre for criminal convictions, an issue that came to light last year when it was revealed authorities in Windsor and Barrie, Ont., were passing information from their files over to Crown prosecutors who used it for vetting jury members in murder trials.

In the wake of the G20 controversy, the Toronto board named lawyer Douglas Hunt, a former Ontario assistant deputy attorney general, to develop the terms of reference for an independent civilian review of police actions.

It will be restricted to the statutory authority of the board, which doesn’t include public complaints about individual conduct by officers. The Ontario ombudsman is also investigating.

Murray Klippenstein, one of two lawyers from his firm who filed notification of a class action in the Ontario Superior Court of Justice, says the question of hidden police files on hundreds of protesters arrested and detained without charge is just one of the issues the lawsuit will likely probe.

“The existence and purpose of that information is a real live issue that probably should be looked at, and those mass arrests highlight that problem,” Klippenstein tells Law Times.

David Midanik, a criminal defence lawyer who deals with constitutional issues and has represented several high-profile cases, says Toronto police and other agencies shouldn’t be allowed to maintain any records of those released without charge.

“It’s wrong, it’s ridiculous, especially in the age of computers,” he says. “It’s just insane. There should be an independent monitor of the agencies who is responsible for monitoring the information they get and also mandating destruction of it.”
http://www.lawtimesnews.com/201009077501/Headline-News/CCLA-vexed-over-police-records-for-G20-detainees
There are no others, there is only us.
http://FastTadpole.com/
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09-08-2010, 05:04 AM,
#8
RE: The G20 Debacle: The largest Police Mobilization in Canada's History.
Thanks for the update FT.
An error does not become truth by reason of multiplied propagation, nor does truth become error because nobody sees it.
Mohandas Gandhi


Each of us is put here in this time and this place to personally decide the future of humankind.
Did you think you were put here for something less?
Chief Arvol Looking Horse
Reply
09-16-2010, 08:02 AM,
#9
RE: The G20 Debacle: The largest Police Mobilization in Canada's History.
These are estimates it ended up being $1.2 Billion.

Quote:Security Costs Report for the Toronto 2010 G8 and G20 Summits
25 June 2010

Parliamentary Budget Officer (PBO)

Download PDF: http://info.publicintelligence.net/TorontoSummitSecurity.pdf
14 pages
June 23, 2010

The Parliament of Canada Act mandates the Parliamentary Budget Officer (PBO) to provide independent analysis to the Senate and House of Commons on the state of the nation’s finances, the government’s estimates and trends in the national economy.

Key Points:

* The PBO was asked to assess the reasonableness of the security costs for the upcoming G8 and G20 Summits in Huntsville and Toronto.
* The Government of Canada has been relatively transparent, when compared to other countries, on the costs of security related to the summits. The total cost of security for the 2010 G8 and G20 Summits amounts to $930M, which includes $507M for RCMP, $278M for Public Safety, $78M for National Defence and a $55M contingency reserve.
* The PBO found it difficult to find comparable data of past events to assess the security costs related to the 2010 Summits. This is largely due to the lack of disclosure by other jurisdictions, differences in key considerations and cost drivers of summit security and differences between base versus incremental funding.
* The estimated costs per RCMP officer and per Canadian Forces unit for the 2010 Summits have risen significantly since the 2002 G8 in Kananaskis. The cost per RCMP officer is also substantially higher than the cost per Canadian Forces unit, and the variance remains unexplained.
* Based on the PBO assumption of a 65/35 cost split between two venues, the PBO does not feel the total cost of security of the 2010 G8 in Huntsville is unreasonable. However, the PBO is unable to provide an assessment of the reasonableness of the total costs of security of the 2010 G20 in Toronto because of the lack of comparable data. Parliament may wish to seek additional analysis from the government in the variance of G20 Summit security costs.

[Image: g20costs.png]

Note: Royal Canadian MILITARY (not Mounted) Police

[Image: g8costs.png]

[Image: g20costs1.png]
http://publicintelligence.net/security-costs-report-for-the-toronto-2010-g8-and-g20-summits/
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