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Saliva Testing Technology Still Unable To Consistently Detect THC - Printable Version

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Saliva Testing Technology Still Unable To Consistently Detect THC - Easy Skanking - 01-31-2009

Quote:Saliva Testing Technology Still Unable To Consistently Detect THC
Illkirch, France: Saliva testing technology fails to detect the recent use of cannabis over 50 percent of the time, according to findings published in the February issue of the journal Therapeutic Drug Monitoring.

French investigators evaluated the ability of oral fluid testing to detect the presence of THC in 20 subjects. Each of the subjects declared that they had smoked cannabis in the 30 minutes to 24 hours prior to testing.

Researchers reported that saliva testing identified THC in only eight of the 20 participants. By contrast, urinalysis testing identified 18 subjects as having previously used cannabis.

Previous evaluations of oral fluid drug testing devices have reported similar results – finding that saliva testing is rarely sensitive to THC beyond one or two hours after past use, and that false positive results are not uncommon.

Presently, several European nations and a handful of US states are testing the use of such devices in an on-going field study investigating the prevalence of motorists who drive under the influence of controlled substances.

Because saliva tests detect the presence of THC, not marijuana's inactive metabolites, and have a much more narrow window of detection compared to urinalysis, advocates of the technology believe that it is far more likely than urine testing to provide evidence regarding whether someone may be under the influence of cannabis.

For more information, please contact Paul Armentano, NORML Deputy Director, at: paul@norml.org. Full text of the study, "Evaluation of the Cozart DDSV test for cannabis in oral fluid," appears in the journal Therapeutic Drug Monitoring.