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Masculinity Blamed for Lunatic’s Actions
01-24-2011, 06:09 PM (This post was last modified: 01-24-2011 06:15 PM by rsol.)
Post: #16
RE: Masculinity Blamed for Lunatic’s Actions
id like to see some feminist statements taken from this century.

Although these statements may have been said it does not mean they did anything but reverberate around peoples ears. feminism is merely a superiority complex in some women, an inferiority complex in others, or at least the extreme side of it. ACTUAL WOMEN, who make up the majority have thier own subscriptions. equality is a dirty word to true feminists but not to real human beings, be they male or female.

Being a man has only one corelation to this event. mass murderers or serial killers tend to be male and white. Or at least the ones in america are.
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01-30-2011, 11:26 AM
Post: #17
RE: Masculinity Blamed for Lunatic’s Actions
Aren't those quotes all mostly from this century? Andrea Dworkin, Gloria Steinem? Well actually 'this century' has only been 11 years or so so I hardly think that's long enough to make them irrelevant, unless you mean the 1800's which I don't believe most of the quotes are from. & Feminists have had a bigger effect on society than you say. Just because most women wouldn't agree with their most extreme statements doesn't mean the influence isn't there, it is.

How Feminists Tried To Destroy The Family by Erin Pizzey

Erin Pizzey, founder of the first battered women refuge, on how militant feminists — with the collusion of Labour's leading women — hijacked her cause and used it to try to demonize all men.

January 22, 2007 — During 1970, I was a young housewife with a husband, two children, two dogs and a cat. We lived in Hammersmith, West London, and I didn't see much of my husband because he worked for TV's Nationwide. I was lonely and isolated, and longed for something other than the usual cooking, cleaning and housework to enter my life.

By the early Seventies, a new movement for women — demanding equality and rights — began to make headlines in the daily newspapers. Among the jargon, I read the words "solidarity" and "support." I passionately believed that women would no longer find themselves isolated from each other, and in the future could unite to change our society for the better.

Within a few days I had the address of a local group in Chiswick, and I was on my way to join the Women's Liberation Movement. I was asked to pay £3 and ten shillings as a joining fee, told to call other women "sisters" and that our meetings were to be called "collectives."

My fascination with this new movement lasted only a few months. At the huge "collectives," I heard shrill women preaching hatred of the family. They said the family was not a safe place for women and children. I was horrified at their virulence and violent tendencies. I stood on the same platforms trying to reason with the leading lights of this new organization.

I ended up being thrown out by the movement. My crime was to warn some of the women working in the Women's Liberation Movement office off Shaftesbury Avenue that if it persisted in cooperating with a plan to bomb Biba, a fashionable clothes shop in Kensington, I would call the police.

Biba was bombed because the women's movement thought it was a capitalist enterprise devoted to sexualizing women's bodies.

I decided that I was wasting my time trying to influence what, to my mind, was a Marxist/ feminist movement touting for money from gullible women like myself.

By that time, I'd met a small group of women in my area who agreed with me. We persuaded Hounslow council to give us a tiny house in Belmont Terrace in Chiswick. We had two rooms upstairs, two rooms downstairs, a kitchen and an outside lavatory. We installed a telephone and typewriter, and we were in business.

Every day after dropping my children at school, I went to our little house, which we called the Women's Aid. Soon women from all over Chiswick were coming to ask for help. At last we had somewhere women could meet each other and bring their children. My long, lonely days were over.

But then something happened that made me understand that our role was going to be more than just a forum where women could exchange ideas. One day, a lady came in to see us. She took off her jersey, and we saw that she was bruised and swollen across her breasts and back. Her husband had taken a chair leg to her. She looked at me and said: "No one will help me."

For a moment I was somersaulted back in time. I was six years old, standing in front of a teacher at school. My legs were striped and bleeding from a whipping I had received from an ironing cord. "My mother did this to me last night," I said. "No wonder," replied the teacher. "You're a dreadful child."

No one would help me then and nobody would ever imagine that my beautiful, rich mother — who was married to a diplomat — could be a violent abuser.

Until that moment 35 years later, I had buried my past and assumed that because we had social workers, probation officers, doctors, hospitals and solicitors, victims of violence had enough help.

I quickly discovered, as battered women with their children poured into the house, that whatever was going on behind other people's front doors was seen as nobody else's business.

If someone was beaten up on the street, it was a criminal offence; the same beating behind a closed door was called "a domestic" and the police had no rights or power to interfere.

The shocking fact for me was that there had been a deafening silence on the subject of domestic violence.

All the social agencies knew about domestic violence, but nobody talked about it. I searched for literature to help me understand this epidemic, but there was nothing to read except a few articles on child abuse in medical journals.

So in 1974 I decided to write Scream Quietly Or The Neighbours Will Hear, the first book in the world on domestic violence. I revealed that women and children were being abused in their own homes and they couldn't escape because the law wouldn't protect them.

If a husband claimed he would have his wife back, she couldn't claim any money from the Department of Health and Social Security, and social services could only offer to take the children into care.

Meanwhile, our little house was packed with women fleeing their violent partners — sometimes as many as 56 mothers and children in four rooms. All had terrible stories, but I recognized almost immediately that not all the women were innocent. Some were as violent as the men, and violent towards their children.

The social workers involved with these women told me I was wasting my time because the women would only return to their partners.

I was determined to try to break the chain of violence. But as the local newspaper picked up the story of our house, I grew worried about a very different threat.

I knew that the radical feminist movement was running out of national support because more sensible women had shunned their anti-male, anti-family agenda. Not only were they looking for a cause, they also wanted money.

In 1974, the women living in my refuge organized a meeting in our local church hall to encourage other groups to open refuges across the country.

We were astonished and frightened that many of the radical lesbian and feminist activists that I had seen in the collectives attended. They began to vote themselves into a national movement across the country.

After a stormy argument, I left the hall with my abused mothers — and what I had most feared happened.

In a matter of months, the feminist movement hijacked the domestic violence movement, not just in Britain, but internationally.

Our grant was given to them and they had a legitimate reason to hate and blame all men. They came out with sweeping statements which were as biased as they were ignorant. "All women are innocent victims of men's violence," they declared.

They opened most of the refuges in the country and banned men from working in them or sitting on their governing committees.

Women with alcohol or drug problems were refused admittance, as were boys over 12 years old. Refuges that let men work there were refused affiliation.

Our group in Chiswick worked with as many refuges as we could. Good, caring women still work in refuges across the country, but many women working in the feminist refuges, about 350, admit they are failing women who most need them.

With the first donation we received in 1972, we employed a male playgroup leader because we felt our children needed the experience of good, gentle men. We devised a treatment programme for women who recognized that they, too, were violent and dysfunctional. And we concentrated on children hurt by violence and sexual abuse.

Yet the feminist refuges continued to create training programmes that described only male violence against women. Slowly, the police and other organizations were brainwashed into ignoring the research that was proving men could also be victims.

Despite attacks in the Press from feminist journalists and threatening anonymous telephone calls, I continued to argue that violence was a learned pattern of behaviour from early childhood.

When, in the mid-Eighties, I published Prone To Violence, about my work with violence-prone women and their children, I was picketed by hundreds of women from feminist refuges, holding placards which read: "All men are bastards" and "All men are rapists."

Because of violent threats, I had to have a police escort around the country.

It was bad enough that this relatively small group of women was influencing social workers and police. But I became aware of a far more insidious development in the form of public policy-making by powerful women, which was creating a poisonous attitude towards men.

In 1990, Harriet Harman (who became a Cabinet minister), Anna Coote (who became an adviser to Labour's Minister for Women) and Patricia Hewitt (yes, she's in the Labour Cabinet, too!) expressed their beliefs in a social policy paper called The Family Way.

It said: "It cannot be assumed that men are bound to be an asset to family life, or that the presence of fathers in families is necessarily a means to social harmony and cohesion."

It was a staggering attack on men and their role in modern life.

Hewitt, in a book by Geoff Dench called Transforming Men published in 1995, said: "But if we want fathers to play a full role in their children's lives, then we need to bring men into the play groups and nurseries and the schools. And here, of course, we hit the immediate difficulty of whether we can trust men with children."

In 1998, however, the Home Office published a historic study which stipulated that men as well as women could be victims of domestic violence.

With that report in my hand, I tried to reason with Joan Ruddock, who was then Minister for Women. The figures for battered men were "minuscule" she insisted and she continued to refer to men only as "perpetrators."

For nearly four decades, these pernicious attitudes towards family life, fathers and boys have permeated the thinking of our society to such an extent that male teachers and carers are now afraid to touch or cuddle children.

Men can be accused of violence towards their partners and sexual abuse without evidence. Courts discriminate against fathers and refuse to allow them access to their children on the whims of vicious partners.

Of course, there are dangerous men who manipulate the court systems and social services to persecute their partners and children. But by blaming all men, we have diluted the focus on this minority of men and pushed aside the many men who would be willing to work with women towards solutions.

I believe that the feminist movement envisaged a new Utopia that depended upon destroying family life. In the new century, so their credo ran, the family unit will consist of only women and their children. Fathers are dispensable. And all that was yoked — unforgivably — to the debate about domestic violence.

To my mind, it has never been a gender issue — those exposed to violence in early childhood often grow up to repeat what they have learned, regardless of whether they are girls or boys.

I look back with sadness to my young self and my vision that there could be places where people — men, women and children who have suffered physical and sexual abuse — could find help, and if they were violent could be given a second chance to learn to live peacefully.

I believe that vision was hijacked by vengeful women who have ghettoized the refuge movement and used it to persecute men. Surely the time has come to challenge this evil ideology and insist that men take their rightful place in the refuge movement.

We need an inclusive movement that offers support to everyone that needs it. As for me — I will always continue to work with anyone who needs my help or can help others — and yes, that includes men.
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01-31-2011, 01:51 AM
Post: #18
RE: Masculinity Blamed for Lunatic’s Actions
(01-24-2011 06:09 PM)rsol Wrote:  Being a man has only one corelation to this event. mass murderers or serial killers tend to be male and white. Or at least the ones in america are.

...or...at least the ones who get caught or confess are!

Everyone thought pedo's were mainly men until recently, and now (esp here in the UK) more and more women are being found out for sexual abuse against children!

(01-30-2011 11:26 AM)Infinite Wrote:  Aren't those quotes all mostly from this century? Andrea Dworkin, Gloria Steinem? Well actually 'this century' has only been 11 years or so so I hardly think that's long enough to make them irrelevant, unless you mean the 1800's which I don't believe most of the quotes are from. & Feminists have had a bigger effect on society than you say. Just because most women wouldn't agree with their most extreme statements doesn't mean the influence isn't there, it is.

You know what, after studying one aspect of the feminist movement (Women in TV) for a short tern at University and recently starting a GREAT book:
[Image: 9780044408703.jpg]
I can say you are right in the great negative affects of feminism in recent times.

That does not mean that I agree certain feminists set out to destroy the family and/or demonise men as a whole as such conclusions would take vast investigation. But many effects have been the destruction of the family and demonising of men as a whole. It may not have always been the intention, but it certainly has been the outcome many times over.

This is a very important area to me, especially as a father of a three year old lad (and a younger girl). I myself have actually (as a child) lived in a women's refuge and also grown up hearing all about my mothers suffering at the hands of men (she was in children's homes etc and foster care when a child), even suffering rape at the hands of one foster father. So of course I have had my fair share of feminist influence. It's only now that I am a man (rather than a horny teenage lad who loved being able to understand girls) that I see the problems I have had as a result of these influences. Hindsight is annoying in that respect, that you cannot go back and slap yourself silly until you wake up.

"He that saith he abideth in him ought himself also so to walk, even as he walked." -- 1 John 2:6
"Whatever affects one directly, affects all indirectly... This is the interrelated structure of reality." -- Martin Luther King Jr.
"He that answereth a matter before he heareth it, it is folly and shame unto him." -- Proverbs 18:13
"Everyone thinks of changing the world, but no one thinks of changing himself." -- Leo Tolstoy
"To love is to be vulnerable" -- C.S Lewis

The Kingdom of God is within you! -- Luke 17:20-21

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02-05-2011, 06:05 PM
Post: #19
RE: Masculinity Blamed for Lunatic’s Actions
(01-31-2011 01:51 AM)Dunamis Wrote:  
(01-24-2011 06:09 PM)rsol Wrote:  Being a man has only one corelation to this event. mass murderers or serial killers tend to be male and white. Or at least the ones in america are.

...or...at least the ones who get caught or confess are!

Everyone thought pedo's were mainly men until recently, and now (esp here in the UK) more and more women are being found out for sexual abuse against children!

(01-30-2011 11:26 AM)Infinite Wrote:  Aren't those quotes all mostly from this century? Andrea Dworkin, Gloria Steinem? Well actually 'this century' has only been 11 years or so so I hardly think that's long enough to make them irrelevant, unless you mean the 1800's which I don't believe most of the quotes are from. & Feminists have had a bigger effect on society than you say. Just because most women wouldn't agree with their most extreme statements doesn't mean the influence isn't there, it is.

You know what, after studying one aspect of the feminist movement (Women in TV) for a short tern at University and recently starting a GREAT book:
[Image: 9780044408703.jpg]
I can say you are right in the great negative affects of feminism in recent times.

That does not mean that I agree certain feminists set out to destroy the family and/or demonise men as a whole as such conclusions would take vast investigation. But many effects have been the destruction of the family and demonising of men as a whole. It may not have always been the intention, but it certainly has been the outcome many times over.

This is a very important area to me, especially as a father of a three year old lad (and a younger girl). I myself have actually (as a child) lived in a women's refuge and also grown up hearing all about my mothers suffering at the hands of men (she was in children's homes etc and foster care when a child), even suffering rape at the hands of one foster father. So of course I have had my fair share of feminist influence. It's only now that I am a man (rather than a horny teenage lad who loved being able to understand girls) that I see the problems I have had as a result of these influences. Hindsight is annoying in that respect, that you cannot go back and slap yourself silly until you wake up.

Thanks for the feedback. I'm sorry to say that that the idea that feminists attempted to break up and destroy families comes directly from their own statements:

* "The nuclear family must be destroyed ... Whatever its ultimate meaning, the break-up of families now is an objectively revolutionary process" - Linda Gordon

* "Marriage has existed for the benefit of men; and has been a legally sanctioned method of control over women ... We must work to destroy it. The end of the institution of marriage is a necessary condition for the liberation of women. Therefore it is important for us to encourage women to leave their husbands and not to live individually with men ... All of history must be re-written in terms of oppression of women. We must go back to ancient female religions like witchcraft" (from "The Declaration of Feminism" November, 1971)

About female child molesters, yes I know people personally who've been molested by women. It was a woman who I believe at least for a while was a feminist too. I wouldn't be surprised if a lot of these bitches project their own predatory nature on to their characterizations of men. In reality abuse isn't about sex/gender. But according to feminist Marilyn French:

"As long as some men use physical force to subjugate females, all men need not. The knowledge that some men do suffices to threaten all women. He can beat or kill the woman he claims to love; he can rape women ... he can sexually molest his daughters ... THE VAST MAJORITY OF MEN IN THE WORLD DO ONE OR MORE OF THE ABOVE" - The War Against Women, p. 182
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