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Canada’s international do-gooder image shattered: Ottawa Loses Bid for UN Security Council
10-25-2010, 10:00 PM (This post was last modified: 10-26-2010 03:31 AM by FastTadpole.)
Post: #1
Canada’s international do-gooder image shattered: Ottawa Loses Bid for UN Security Council
Canada’s international do-gooder image shattered: Ottawa Loses Bid for UN Security Council

By Eric Walberg

Global Research, October 21, 2010

Canada’s international do-gooder image was shattered when it lost its bid for a UN Security Council seat

The humiliating withdrawal by Canada from the race with Germany and Portugal for a covetted place on the United Nations Security Council revealed what close observers have long known -- that the current Conservative government in Ottawa has nothing but disdain for the world’s tattered peacekeeper and would most likely just use its seat to serve US and Israel’s agenda. Four years of Stephen Harper’s government was enough for the world to turn its back on a once beloved peacenik.

Dubai’s police chief’s announcement Monday that Canada is covering up its arrest of a suspect in Israel’s assassination of Palestinian leader Mahmoud al-Mabhouh in the UAE in January merely confirms the world’s distrust.

Canada has served on the SC many times in the past, once each decade since the 1950s, and was never refused when it ran for a seat. It carved out a highly respected role: the good cop to its southern neighbour’s bad cop. It refused to break relations with Cuba after the 1959 revolution, refused to send troops to Vietnam (unlike another privileged ex-British colony Australia), recognised China in 1970, and refused to send troops to Iraq in 2003 despite intense pressure from US president George Bush.

One of Canada’s finest moments was Lester Pearson’s Nobel Peace Prize in 1957 for negotiating the withdrawal from Egypt’s Sinai of Israeli troops, replaced by UN peacekeepers, including, yes, Canadians. Israel killed the 14 UN soldiers caught there during its invasion of Sinai in 1967, though that did not prompt Pearson to return his prize for helping create a no man's land that proved to be easy prey for the Israelis.

How did the present sorry state of affairs come to pass? Canadian Conservatives from the days of Confederation in 1867 until relatively recently stood for an independent Canada, and old-time Conservatives today are as shocked as anyone. The only arguably great Conservative leader since Confederation, John Diefenbaker, refused to station US nuclear weapons on Canadian soil, defying a furious US president Kennedy.

But the old Progressive Conservative Party was highjacked in 2003 by predominantly small-town right-wingers, boosted by the rising evangelical Christian movement, a repeat of what happened to the US Republican Party in the 1990s. The fiasco at the UN was “the world’s response to a Canadian foreign policy designed to please the most reactionary, short-sighted sectors of the Conservative Party’s base -- evangelical Christian Zionists, extreme right-wing Jews, Islamophobes, the military-industrial-academic-complex, mining and oil executives and old Cold-Warriors,” writes Yves Engler, author of Canada and Israel: Building Apartheid.

In every corner of the world, Ottawa is now following US neocon policies, as if scripted in Bush’s Washington. On environment and the world economy, over the past four year Harper’s government has

-blocked former British PM Gordon Brown’s global tax on international financial transactions
-refused to recognise the human right to water
-refused to sign the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples
-blocked consensus at the Rotterdam Convention to ban the toxin chrysotile asbestos
-supported the environmentally disastrous “tar sands” oil extraction project
-blocked a binding commitment on rich countries to reduce carbon emissions. It even suggested the Kyoto Protocol be scrapped at a UN climate conference session in Bangkok last year, prompting dozens of delegates to walk out in protest.

Over 3,000 Canadian mines operate in Latin America, Africa (especially the Congo), India and other unfortunate third world venues, and are far and away the world’s worst offenders in terms of environmental destruction and human rights abuses, according to the Canadian Centre for the Study of Resource Conflict, but these companies are the Conservatives’ close friends and supporters. At the G8 in June, the Conservatives used Canada’s prominence as host to call in the G8 to criticise war-wracked Congo for its meagre attempts to gain a greater share of its vast mineral wealth, which is virtually untaxed and has been stolen from under the Congolese for more than a century.

Targetting poor Congo elsewhere, Ottawa obstructed international efforts to reschedule Congo’s foreign debt, the legacy of three decades of US-backed Joseph Mobuto’s dictatorship. Canadian officials “have a problem with what’s happened with a Canadian company,” Congolese Information Minister Lambert Mende said, referring to his government’s move to revoke a Canadian mining concession acquired during the 1998-2003 war. “The Canadian government wants to use the Paris Club [of debtor nations] in order to resolve a particular problem.”

The Conservatives love the mining companies so much they have even stalled a Liberal proposal that the mining companies themselves agreed to at their Mining Association of Canada under pressure from civil society groups “to make diplomatic and financial support for resource companies operating overseas contingent upon socially responsible conduct”. The Conservatives nod and wink that it’s enough to rely on “voluntary standards” to improve Canadian mining companies’ notorious behaviour.

The relations between Harper’s Conservatives and Bush’s Republicans were so close, there was serious speculation that then-foreign minister Peter MacKay was having a love affair with his US counterpart secretary of state Condoleezza Rice. Moving on from his Foreign Affairs, the Canadian Romeo was made minister of defence in 2008, where he resolved to spend $400 billion over 25 years to increase Canada’s armed forces in line with US-NATO demands.

In 2009, the so-called Canadian Afghan detainee abuse scandal erupted, when Canadian diplomat in Afghanistan Richard Colvin, appalled by his own complicity there in the torture of hundreds if not thousands of innocent Afghans, blew the whistle. He submitted documents to a House of Commons Committee proving both Harper and MacKay knew of the torture. Even now, Canadian Joint Task Force 2 commandos regularly take part in illegal night-time assassination raids.

The government’s answer? Declare the documents top secret and dismiss parliament, just as it did in 2008 when the opposition agreed to join forces and replace the minority Conservative government, as is their right in a parliamentary democracy.

“It’s hard to find a country friendlier to Israel than Canada these days,” chirps Israeli Foreign Minister Avigdor Lieberman. Stephen Harper’s Conservatives
-called Israel’s 2006 invasion of Lebanon a “measured response” (Two Canadian UN peacekeepers were targeted and killed by Israeli in the invasion. Harper refused to protest, asking rhetorically in parliament what they were doing there in the first place.)
-refused to condemn the invasion of Gaza in December 2008 or the siege of Gaza (the only “Nay” at the UN Human Rights Council)
-refused to condemn the Israeli murder of nine members of the Gaza Freedom Flotilla in May
-opposed an attempted IAEA probe of Israel’s nuclear facilities as part of an effort to create a nuclear-weapons-free Middle East.
-cut off UN humanitarian aid to Gaza because it was going through the Hamas government there.

That $15 million for UNRWA-Gaza was not actually cancelled by Harper; it was cleverly transferred to Operation PROTEUS, a plan to train a Palestinian security force “to ensure that the Palestinian Authority maintains control of the West Bank against Hamas,” according to Canadian Ambassador to Israel Jon Allen. Boasts Minister of State for Foreign Affairs of the Americas Peter Kent, this is the country’s “second largest deployment after Afghanistan”.

While Canada trains police to contain Palestinian anger, it is rapidly expanding relations with the Palestinians’ colonial masters. Minister of International Trade Peter Van Loan just held talks in Tel Aviv to further expand the Canada-Israel Free Trade Agreement. Already robust, Canadian-Israeli trade has more than doubled since its implementation in 1997. Canada even allows goods manufactured in occupied territories by illegal settlers to be labelled “Made in Israel”.

Canada and Israel signed a far-reaching public security cooperation “partnership” in 2008 to “protect their respective countries’ population, assets and interests from common threats”. Israel security agents now officially assist the RCMP and CSIS in profiling Canadians citizens who are Muslims and monitoring individuals and/or organisations in Canada involved in supporting the rights of Palestinians. The barring of British MP George Galloway from entering Canada in 2009 was surely at the behest of now official Mossad advisers.

Not only did Congo get a drubbing at the G8 in Toronto this June, so did Iran. Kent told his confreres, “It’s a matter of timing and it’s a matter of how long we can wait without taking more serious pre-emptive action.” Read: Off with their heads! “An attack on Israel would be considered an attack on Canada.” Read: Canada is a province of Israel. Canadian naval vessels are already “exercising” off Iran’s coast, waiting for the fun to begin.

Harper and MacKay have hosted NATO Arctic war games aimed at the “aggressive” Russians, and announced plans to spend $9 billion to buy F-35 joint strike “stealth” fighter jets to “meet the threats of the 21st century”.

The militarisation of Canadian foreign policy extends from the Arctic to earthquake-wracked Haiti, which got 2,000 Canadian troops within hours, bumping several Heavy Urban Search Rescue Teams, which were left behind. Foreign Affairs Minister Lawrence Cannon later explained that the teams were not needed. Canada was part of the coup that overthrew and exiled Haiti’s elected president Jean-Bertrand Aristide in 2004, and the Conservatives happily support the ban on his political party Fanmi Lavalits in upcoming elections. Similar to its policy in Palestine, Ottawa is spending tens of millions of dollars to train Haitian prison guards and police.

Like its policy in Haiti, Ottawa implicitly supported the coup against left-leaning Honduran president Manuel Zelaya in 2009 and continues to provide aid and train its military. Canada was the only country that did not explicitly call for Zelaya’s return to power -- even Obama did that much.

“Americas” Foreign Minister Kent’s kudos are for Colombia and his criticism is aimed at Venezuela: “Democratic space within Venezuela has been shrinking and in this election year, Canada is very concerned about the rights of all Venezuelans to participate in the democratic process.” Venezuela’s Ambassador to the Organisation of American States Roy Matos was nonplussed: “I am talking of a Canada governed by an ultra right that closed its parliament for months to evade an investigation over the violation of human rights -- I am talking about torture and assassinations by its soldiers in Afghanistan.”

I need not continue this sad litany. If you want to know Harper’s position on any foreign policy issue, just ask: “What would Bush say?” or in the case of MacKay, “What would Condie say?” Of course, even before this neocon rape of Canada’s body politic, Canadian foreign policy never really strayed very far into the woods. The Pearson legacy of “humanitarian imperialism” endures in his Liberal successors Trudeau, Chretien and now Michael Ignatieff, though the latter, as an American scholar and supporter of the Iraq invasion, is surely pushing the limits.

It’s not even clear that Harper gave a hoot about the UNSC seat. Was there any soul-searching after the defeat? Perhaps a belated acknowledgment that Canada has veered just a tad from its purported role as everyone’s favourite peacenik? No. Instead, the Conservatives attacked stuffed-shirt Ignatieff for scuttling the bid with his criticisms of “Canadian” foreign policy, though no one at the UN needed any prompting, and there is absolutely nothing “Canadian” about what Harper’s neocon crew are up to.

Israeli-American analyst Israel Matzav laments, “Canada’s candidacy was voted down because of its close relations with Israel.” Perhaps Matzav, Harper and the like should smell the coffee percolating around the world these days. Israeli colonialism and US neocolonialism are increasingly out of favour, at last.

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10-25-2010, 10:26 PM (This post was last modified: 10-25-2010 10:34 PM by yeti.)
Post: #2
RE: Canada’s international do-gooder image shattered: Ottawa Loses Bid for UN Security Co
Don Martin, Calgary Herald, October 8, 2010

OTTAWA — We deserve it. We should win it. But if Canada doesn't score a seat on the United Nations Security Council in Tuesday's vote — beaten out by economically teetering Portugal, of all places — the government has a scapegoat on standby.

The blame is set to fall on Liberal leader Michael Ignatieff.

That's the only interpretation for a bizarre speech to international diplomats by Foreign Affairs Minister Lawrence Cannon this week where he highlighted comments from Ignatieff which suggested this particular Conservative government doesn't deserve the Security Council spot.

"One of the few persons who believe that Canada should not sit on the Security Council, unfortunately, is the leader of the opposition," Cannon fumed, oblivious to diplomatic discomfort in the crowd.

Inside betting has it that most of these mission heads were unaware of Ignatieff's view before Mr. Cannon raised them. Any alerts to their homelands about the Official Opposition Leader's curious suggestion that Canada's costly campaign deserved to fail would only have been dispatched after the speech.

About the only translation for injecting partisan jabs into a sensitive discussion at the last minute is that Foreign Affairs is readying the blame game in case it loses the bid.

The odds of Canada winning appeared to improve on Friday afternoon with news that rival Portugal would support Canada over Germany without actually exiting the competition. Very odd strategy, that.

Winning the seat will not give Canada a huge hand in directing global powers on matters of international security. It's doubtful existing Security Council members like Austria, Gabon, Uganda and Nigeria have done much to sway world affairs. Besides, the five permanent members — Britain, China, France, Russia and the United States — have a veto over anything the council might propose.

But avoiding defeat is crucial to saving face. This is, after all, a global vote of confidence in Canada's status. If we lose the count, the government's foreign policy credentials will be tarnished on the world stage.

That's why the Harper government has spent billions on maternal health and foreign aid bumps to support its campaign. Calgary MP Deepak Obhrai figures he's circled the world several times in an 18-month shmoozing effort to land votes.

Why it's an important seat is open to debate. To read the meetings and lists of watered-down resolutions is to see a glorified city council in action, where the same old issues seem to be under constant discussion and on-tour examination with very little improvement noted.

But every 10 years or so Canada has been given one of the 10 elected seats, undoubtedly a reward for a long foreign policy history of UN peacekeeping.

With the rotation coming back to our turn, winning should be a no-brainer, particularly given Canada's heavyweight status in the UN International Security Assistance Force mission to Afghanistan where we've sacrificed 152 soldiers.

Not to belittle a rival, but Portugal is one of the leading economic casualties of a sickly Europe. It's UN membership fees are apparently in arrears. It deployed one-tenth our force to Afghanistan and suffered two casualties there.

With apologies to any offended Portuguese sensitivities, it is simply not worthy of a seat at the big table and should bow out to acclaim Canada's position rather than simply stick around as a possible spoiler.

Perhaps the major tangible benefit to a Canadian win would be to sharpen the focus of a foreign policy which will need a new challenge after next year's withdrawal from Afghanistan.

The military's next assignment is uncertain, but it has the hardware and the manpower to be a military middle power and, this is just a hunch, I'm betting its soldiers don't want to be back wearing UN blue peacekeeping helmets playing unarmed referee between peace-avoiding enemies.

Finding a new role on the world stage would be helped by a seat at global security's boardroom table.

But if we fail in our bid to land a seventh term on the council, this government would be smart to look in the mirror for the reasons instead of taking aim at a Liberal leader who merely uttered a prophetic observation.

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10-25-2010, 10:45 PM (This post was last modified: 10-25-2010 10:47 PM by yeti.)
Post: #3
RE: Canada’s international do-gooder image shattered: Ottawa Loses Bid for UN Security Co
Liberal leader refuses to accept blame
CBC News, October 12, 2010

[Image: tp-cannon-cp-121010.jpg]
Foreign Affairs Minister Lawrence Cannon blamed Liberal Leader
Michael Ignatieff for Canada's failure to win a seat on
the United Nations Security Council, saying his criticism
showed the country 'was not united' on the matter. (CBC)


Foreign Minister Lawrence Cannon says the lack of support from Michael Ignatieff for Canada's bid to win a seat on the United Nations Security Council helped scuttle it, an assertion the Liberal leader called "ridiculous."

Canada abruptly dropped its bid for a seat on the council after coming behind Portugal in second ballot voting Tuesday in New York. Cannon said the Canadian government will continue to work with its UN partners despite the outcome.

Germany won one of two seats up for grabs in the first round of voting earlier Tuesday, with 128 of 191 ballots cast, while Portugal came second with 122 votes and Canada collected 114.

"Not being able to speak with one voice as a country had a negative impact on Canada's bid," Cannon said at a press conference after Canada withdrew.

"Canada was not united because some saw this as an opportunity to score political points by opposing Canada's candidacy."

"[Ignatieff] came out clearly indicating that Canada did not deserve a seat ... and for that, of course, we were extremely disappointed," Cannon said.

"I have never seen in the course of the last months any leader of a political party, both in Germany or in Portugal, dismiss their country's candidacy."
Ignatieff says Canada ignored UN

In previous years, Canada had always spoken with one voice, Cannon said.

In the lead-up to the vote, as the merits of the Security Council bid were being debated in the Commons, Ignatieff said he didn't believe Canada had earned the right to sit there.

"This is a government that for four years has basically ignored the United Nations and now is suddenly showing up saying, 'Hey, put us on the council,'" he said.

"Don't mistake me. I know how important it is for Canada to get a seat on the Security Council, but Canadians have to ask a tough question: 'Has this government earned that place?' We're not convinced it has."

At a news conference in Ottawa on Tuesday, Ignatieff called it a "sad and disappointing" as well as "historic day" for Canada because "it's the first time in more than 60 years we failed to secure a seat on an institution that this country helped found.... It's part of the general pattern of disappointing results for Canada on the international stage."

Ignatieff refused to accept blame for losing the seat.

"The responsibility for this vote lies squarely and exclusively with the Harper government. Any other proposition is just too ridiculous to entertain," he said. "Don't try this blame game with Canadians."

Ignatieff went on to say, "I derive zero pleasure out of this.... Canada deserves a place on the security council."
Leader Leader Michael Ignatieff refused to accept blame for Canada losing its bid for a seat on the UN Security Council Tuesday.Leader Leader Michael Ignatieff refused to accept blame for Canada losing its bid for a seat on the UN Security Council Tuesday. (CBC)

Meanwhile, NDP Foreign Affairs critic Paul Dewar said losing the vote for a seat is a "catastrophe" for Canada's reputation and credibility.

"Perhaps more importantly, we're not going to be at the table and, therefore, we can't affect the agenda," Dewar told reporters in Ottawa.

"The government can look for people to blame, but the government should look in the mirror and blame itself.... I do lay this at the feet of our prime minister and our foreign affairs minister," he said. "This government has ... formulated a foreign policy based on domestic gain and talking points."

In a statement, John Bennett, executive director of the Sierra Club Canada, said, "Canada's unilateral withdrawal from the United Nations' legally binding treaty on climate change [Kyoto Protocol] may have played an important role in Canada's lost bid."

John McNee, Canada's UN ambassador, made the surprise announcement that Canada would pull out after its poor showing on the second ballot — 78 to Portugal's 113. A two-thirds majority is needed to win a seat.

It is the first time that Canada has failed in its bid for a Security Council seat. Canada has been on the Security Council six times, roughly once a decade, since the 1940s. The country's last term ended in 2000. Germany and Portugal have also been on the council previously.

Canada had campaigned for nine years — since its last term on the council — for a seat. In the final days of Tuesday's bid, Canada wined and dined diplomats, offering them gifts of Canadian beer and maple syrup.

Canada even had a Mountie in red serge as a prop flown in so the 192 foreign diplomats who were casting ballots could get a photo with him.
Foreign policy might be to blame

Some observers believe the Harper government's foreign policy is largely responsible for the outcome, including its pro-Israel stance on the Middle East, cutting foreign aid to Africa, and also the move away from UN peacekeeping and toward the Afghan mission.

However, Cannon dismissed the idea.

"I do not in any way see this as a repudiation of Canada's foreign policy," he said. "The principles underlying our foreign policy, such as freedom, democracy, respect for human rights and the rule of law, were the basis of all our decisions.

"Some would even say that because of our attachment to those values that we lost a seat on the council. If that's the case, then so be it."

Dimitri Soudas, spokesman for Harper, said Ignatieff's earlier comments had "spread like wildfire" to diplomatic missions around the globe.

Other factors at play were that the EU and EU-aspiring countries voted as a block for Germany and Portugal, Soudas said. Moreover, some of the commitments made to support Canada did not materialize in the balloting.

Cannon rejected the notion that the Harper government's unabashed support for Israel may have cost Canada support from Arab countries.

Canada's pullout came less than 24 hours after a diplomatic row resulted in a military plane carrying Defence Minister Peter MacKay and Chief of Defence Staff Gen. Walt Natynczyk being denied permission Monday to land in the United Arab Emirates.

That dispute is linked to Canada's refusal to allow the UAE to increase passenger flights to this country. That in turn led to the UAE demanding Canada pull up stakes at its formerly secret military base near Dubai.

Soudas said he doubted that the Harper government's refusal to give more landing rights to airlines from the UAE had any bearing on the vote.

A senior government official said Canada actually got "a good chunk" of the Arab vote.

Three other two-year terms on the UN's most powerful body went uncontested to South Africa, India and Colombia.

The five new non-permanent council members replace Austria, Japan, Mexico, Turkey and Uganda, whose terms end on Dec. 31. The five members elected last year — Bosnia, Brazil, Gabon, Lebanon and Nigeria — will remain on the council until the end of 2011.

Council members are supposed to be chosen on the basis of their contributions to international peace and security, and all three have highlighted their contributions to UN peacekeeping. Canada made particular mention of its involvement in the war in Afghanistan.

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10-25-2010, 10:46 PM
Post: #4
RE: Canada’s international do-gooder image shattered: Ottawa Loses Bid for UN Security Co
Yes kids, Harper and his Conservative minority "government" are incompetent, but hey, what else is new?

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10-26-2010, 04:39 AM
Post: #5
RE: Canada’s international do-gooder image shattered: Ottawa Loses Bid for UN Security Council
Quote:Ignatieff went on to say, "I derive zero pleasure out of this.... Canada deserves a place on the security council."

While barely being able hold back a Cheshire grin despite his years of deadpan stoneface training in Europe. This guy is so un-Canadian he didn't even want to show his support for the Canadian Olyimpic Hockey team against Russia even though that would be a political no-brainer. He's lived most of his life outside of Canada being groomed for Prime Minister only to be crowned by appointment upon his royal return.

Michael Ignatieff's Royal Russian roots run deep:

Quote:His Russian forebears include the aristocratic families of Bibikov, Galitzine, Ignatyev, Karamzin, Maltsev, Meshchersky, Panin, and Tolstoy, and encompass many members of the old service nobility. His paternal grandfather, Count Paul Ignatieff, served as the last Tsarist Minister of Education (1915–1917), whose reputation as a liberal reformer led to his being spared from execution by the Bolsheviks. His patrilineal great-grandfather was Count Nikolay Pavlovich Ignatyev, the Russian Minister of the Interior under Tsar Alexander III, who is considered the architect of modern Bulgaria's independence from the Ottoman Empire. Via the latter's wife, Ignatieff descends from Field Marshal Kutuzov whose victory over Napoleon's Grande Armée at Smolensk in 1812 saved Russia from foreign subjugation

The Russian Album, won the Canadian 1987 Governor General's Award for Non-Fiction and the British Royal Society of Literature's Heinemann Prize.
~ wiki

Quote:Ignatieff has argued that Western democracies may have to resort to "lesser evils" like indefinite detention of suspects, coercive interrogations, assassinations, and pre-emptive wars in order to combat the greater evil of terrorism.
~ McQuaig, Linda (2007). "Sidekicks to American Empire". Random House. http://thetyee.ca/Books/2007/05/01/McQuaig.

That's just some of the dirt on him from wiki. Harper almost looks good compared to this guy. I fear for Canadians, myself and my children included, if this Iggy guy ever gains any more power. Not that Harper's bending over to the UN approach has won me over in the slightest.

"Count" Ignatieff cites his primary Canadian influence as Pierre Trudeau - A Rumoured (according to maids and patrons) Freebaser, Satanist. Known instigator of Martial Law (PLQ), Division of the Country (forced Bilingualism) and the instalment of positive rights (Charter of Rights and Freedoms). Thank the premiers at least forcing the inclusion of the notwithstanding clause.

This entire fiasco is another part of the set up to garner support for the Liberals and Ignatieff so they get control (hopefully not a majority) of Canadian Parliament. CBC and the majority of National newspapers seem to be pro-liberal, if not overtly at times at least under their breath.

To break up the Conservative straglehold and get more Liberals elected in Alberta (first provincially then perhaps federally) we've seen the move of introducing a second "right wing" political party in the Wild Rose Alliance.

A single ballot would split the vote and set up the coming generations of greenwashed kids (future adults) to have a more socialist utopia planted in their heads as opposed to the hard working, we don't like hand-outs, (mostly) responsible resource development, free market and entrepreneurial spirit that has made Alberta an economic powerhouse. This is not to say that the Alberta Conservatives don't do their fair share of selling out like approving the sale of $1.9B in oilsands (a rock bottom bargain basement price) to PetroChina.

Reeling this one back on topic .. The Canadian Image is self-delusional or at least waning. Canadians have a far better perception of themselves than they really do have really earned overseas according to many polls. They are seen to have an inflated ego about their country of origin, and with an increasing amount of douchebags I run into locally, the posers with flags on their backpacks, wanna be Americans from T.O. pretending to be Cnadian tourists from and our puppet of of a puppet of a puppet foreign policy I am not the least bit surprised.

I haven't left Alberta since I was 12 and I've never been anywhere but BC - so I couldn't really comment.

I was wondering if anyone else can back up this feeling towards Canadiadians.

There are no others, there is only us.
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10-26-2010, 06:21 AM (This post was last modified: 10-27-2010 12:48 AM by yeti.)
Post: #6
RE: Canada’s international do-gooder image shattered: Ottawa Loses Bid for UN Security Council
(10-26-2010 04:39 AM)FastTadpole Wrote:  Michael Ignatieff's Royal Russian roots run deep:

(10-26-2010 04:39 AM)FastTadpole Wrote:  "Count" Ignatieff cites his primary Canadian influence as Pierre Trudeau - A Rumoured (according to maids and patrons) Freebaser, Satanist. Known instigator of Martial Law (PLQ), Division of the Country (forced Bilingualism) and the instalment of positive rights (Charter of Rights and Freedoms). Thank the premiers at least forcing the inclusion of the notwithstanding clause.

The notwithstanding clause invalidates the entire Charter because it allows any government, including the federal, to decide when they can ignore a right.

(10-26-2010 04:39 AM)FastTadpole Wrote:  This entire fiasco is another part of the set up to garner support for the Liberals and Ignatieff so they get control (hopefully not a majority) of Canadian Parliament. CBC and the majority of National newspapers seem to be pro-liberal, if not overtly at times at least under their breath.

[quote='FastTadpole' pid='200821' dateline='1288064385'](mostly) responsible resource development, free market and entrepreneurial spirit that has made Alberta an economic powerhouse.

Alberta would be a backwater if it wasn't for the tar sands and sour gas well development. The environmental damage being done there and in Saskatchewan is criminal.

One of theses days a tar pond wall will collapse. We will become a laughingstock of the world when it happens...

(10-26-2010 04:39 AM)FastTadpole Wrote:  Canadians have a far better perception of themselves than they really do have really earned overseas according to many polls.

It depends who you talk to, how you talk to them, and where you go. I had no trouble in London or Scotland, or anywhere in the states - Americans love Canadians. They treat us better than other Americans because they trust us more.

(10-26-2010 04:39 AM)FastTadpole Wrote:  I haven't left Alberta since I was 12 and I've never been anywhere but BC - so I couldn't really comment.

Ouch! You need to fix this problem immediately...

(10-26-2010 04:39 AM)FastTadpole Wrote:  I was wondering if anyone else can back up this feeling towards Canadiadians.

LOL

You just coined a new term!

From now I'm calling naive flag-waving jingoistic wide-eyed Canadians Canadiadians!

You know the type - they think they're more Canadian than you are...

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10-26-2010, 06:24 AM (This post was last modified: 10-27-2010 12:47 AM by yeti.)
Post: #7
RE: Canada’s international do-gooder image shattered: Ottawa Loses Bid for UN Security Council
...then of course they're the Americaricans.

Code:
<John Wayne>Sonny, I'm not just American, I'm Americarican!</John Wayne>

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10-26-2010, 02:09 PM
Post: #8
RE: Canada’s international do-gooder image shattered: Ottawa Loses Bid for UN Security Council
How about Canindians? For those who were born here but are not First Nations people.

Thanks for the informative posts guys.

I don't think Canada deserves a seat on the security council, our federal government is a US\Israel lackey. The only seat we deserve is one on the insecurity council, IMO.

An error does not become truth by reason of multiplied propagation, nor does truth become error because nobody sees it.
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10-27-2010, 12:59 AM
Post: #9
RE: Canada’s international do-gooder image shattered: Ottawa Loses Bid for UN Security Council
(10-26-2010 02:09 PM)icosaface Wrote:  How about Canindians? For those who were born here but are not First Nations people.

I like the word, but not the definition. IMO Canindians are the aboriginals - who BTW hate the term native canadians and also the word aboriginal. They call themselves indians, but mostly by their tribe name.

(10-26-2010 02:09 PM)icosaface Wrote:  I don't think Canada deserves a seat on the security council, our federal government is a US\Israel lackey. The only seat we deserve is one on the insecurity council, IMO.

Good point. We should rename the security council more accurately - the insecurity council.

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