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After coup, Chavez warns Honduran military
06-29-2009, 03:44 AM
Post: #1
After coup, Chavez warns Honduran military
After coup, Chavez warns Honduran military

Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez says he has put his military on alert after a coup in Honduras and vowed to do whatever necessary to return President Manuel Zelaya to power.

Chavez said on Sunday that he will not recognize any president in Honduras other than Zelaya, who was ousted by troops and flown to Costa Rica.

The socialist leader said if his ambassador or embassy is attacked, "the military junta ... would be entering a state of war."

Chavez said he put the Venezuelan military "on alert." He did not say that Caracas would take military action against Honduras, but he did not rule out such a measure either.

The Venezuelan president vowed that he would overthrow Congress leader Roberto Micheletti's presidency, should he be sworn in.

Under Honduras' constitution, the congress leader will assume office in the event that the president is not able to perform his duties.

Chavez further said that he was traveling to Managua, Nicaragua, later on Sunday for a meeting of regional leaders on the issue.

link - http://www.presstv.ir/detail.aspx?id=99299...ionid=351020704

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06-29-2009, 06:31 AM
Post: #2
After coup, Chavez warns Honduran military
I say the CIA is there already. Advising the Nazi rich cock suckers on how to proceed..

Unite The Many, defeat the few.

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06-30-2009, 04:24 PM
Post: #3
After coup, Chavez warns Honduran military
Quote:I say the CIA is there already. Advising the Nazi rich cock suckers on how to proceed..

This is some of the information they have as of right now on their site:

Quote:Executive branch:
Field info displayed for all countries in alpha order.
chief of state: President Jose Manuel ZELAYA Rosales (since 27 January 2006); Vice President Commissioner Aristides MEJIA Carranza (since 1 February 2009); note - the president is both the chief of state and head of government; because the president and vice president are elected on the same ticket, the position of "vice president commissioner" was created after Vice President Elvin SANTOS resigned in late 2008 to run for president in the November 2009 election
head of government: President Jose Manuel ZELAYA Rosales (since 27 January 2006); Vice President Commissioner Aristides MEJIA Carranza (since 1 February 2009)
cabinet: Cabinet appointed by president
elections: president elected by popular vote for a four-year term; election last held 27 November 2005 (next to be held in November 2009)
election results: Jose Manuel ZELAYA Rosales elected president - 49.8%, Porfirio "Pepe" LOBO Sosa 46.1%, other 4.1%
Legislative branch:
Field info displayed for all countries in alpha order.
unicameral National Congress or Congreso Nacional (128 seats; members are elected proportionally by department to serve four-year terms)
elections: last held 27 November 2005 (next to be held in November 2009)
election results: percent of vote by party - NA; seats by party - PL 62, PN 55, PUD 5, PDC 4, PINU 2
Judicial branch:
Field info displayed for all countries in alpha order.
Supreme Court of Justice or Corte Suprema de Justicia (15 judges are elected for seven-year terms by the National Congress)
Political parties and leaders:
Field info displayed for all countries in alpha order.
Christian Democratic Party or PDC [Felicito AVILA]; Democratic Unification Party or PUD [Cesar HAM]; Liberal Party or PL [Patricia RODAS]; National Innovation and Unity Party or PINU [Jorge AQUILAR Paredes]; National Party of Honduras or PN [Porfirio LOBO]
Political pressure groups and leaders:
Field info displayed for all countries in alpha order.
Committee for the Defense of Human Rights in Honduras or CODEH; Confederation of Honduran Workers or CTH; Coordinating Committee of Popular Organizations or CCOP; General Workers Confederation or CGT; Honduran Council of Private Enterprise or COHEP; National Association of Honduran Campesinos or ANACH; National Union of Campesinos or UNC; Popular Bloc or BP; United Confederation of Honduran Workers or CUTH
International organization participation:
Field info displayed for all countries in alpha order.
BCIE, CACM, FAO, G-77, IADB, IAEA, IBRD, ICAO, ICCt, ICRM, IDA, IFAD, IFC, IFRCS, ILO, IMF, IMO, Interpol, IOC, IOM, ISO (subscriber), ITSO, ITU, ITUC, LAES, LAIA (observer), MIGA, MINURSO, NAM, OAS, OPANAL, OPCW, PCA, RG, SICA, UN, UNCTAD, UNESCO, UNIDO, Union Latina, UNWTO, UPU, WCL, WCO, WFTU, WHO, WIPO, WMO, WTO

https://www.cia.govbrary/publications/th...ok/geos/HO.html

I can find no updated comments

Quote:Honduras This Week Online
Honduras united to defend its Constitution and Democracy

News - Opinions & Editorial

Honduras has always been a peaceful country and the people have sometimes seemed a bit soft. But Hondurans have proved that they can unite and the can fight back when their peaceful and free way of life is threatened.
Former President Manuel Zelaya Rosales was destituted from his office as president of Honduras on Sunday, June 28th, when armed forces escorted him out of his residence and out of the country. That same day Congress followed the process of a constitutional substitution of the president, naming Roberto Micheletti, President of Congress at the time, as the new constitutional president of Honduras.

By Nicole Marrder Read Article
Comments (2)

Cronological Summary of the Facts in Honduras

News - National

In order for people to understand why there is a new government in the country, the Liberal Party of Honduras emitted a Cronolical Report of the Facts that led to the Constitutional transition of government on Sunday June 28th.

By Honduras This Week Read Article
Comments (3)

US Reluctant to Cut off Aid to Honduras

News - Opinions & Editorial

Although the US government has firmly condemned the ousting of President Manuel Zelaya on June 28 and joined the chorus of nations calling for his immediate return to power, the Obama administration has opted to hold off on any decision to officially characterize the removal of Mr. Zelaya as a military coup.

By Marco Caceres/ Projecthonduras.com Read Article

Honduran Military Caught in the Middle of Power Struggle Between the President and Congress

News - National

In several of his interviews following his arrest and expulsion from Honduras, President Manuel Zelaya has portrayed himself as an innocent victim of a coup d'état (“golpe de estado”). His view has been amplified by foreign leaders such as President Hugo Chavez of Venezuela, Daniel Ortega of Nicaragua, and Rafael Correa of Ecuador.

By Marco Caceres/ Projecthonduras.com Read Article
Comments (10)

President Zelaya Arrested and Exiled to Costa Rica

News - National

President Manuel Zelaya was arrested early on Sunday, June 28 by a 12-member Honduran military team. Some 200 soldiers, supported by tanks, arrived at Mr. Zelaya’s residence at dawn and surrounded the presidential palace amidst hundreds of protesters. Police used tear gas to disperse the crowd, and Mr. Zelaya was transported to an air force base on the outskirts of Tegucigalpa and flown into exile to San Jose, Costa Rica.

By MArco Caceres / Projecthonduras.com Read Article
Comments (2)

Controversy Surrounding the Fourth Box Reaches Breaking Point

News - National

Controversy over the introduction of the ‘cuarta urna’ or fourth box has reached a fevered pitch across Honduras as the date of the national referendum approaches. The fourth box referendum is non-binding and will ask Hondurans whether they want to vote on constitutional change.

By Pratheepa Kandaswamy with Oliver J. Dimsdale Read Article
Comments (1)

President Zelaya Sacks Head of Joint Chiefs

News - National

In a move designed to consolidate power and gain control over Honduras’ armed forces, President Zelaya sacked the head of the Joint Chiefs, Gen. Romeo Vásquez Velásquez on June 24, further escalating the political crisis in Honduras fueled by Mr. Zelaya’s insistence on staging a public referendum (the so-called “cuarta urna”) on whether or not to elect a National Constituent Assembly to re-write the country’s Constitution.

By Marco Caceres Read Article

http://www.hondurasthisweek.com/

unfortunately, we are not privy to intellipedia :rolleyes::)
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06-30-2009, 04:26 PM (This post was last modified: 06-30-2009 04:28 PM by ---.)
Post: #4
After coup, Chavez warns Honduran military
Quote:Rare Hemisphere Unity in Assailing Honduran Coup


By SIMON ROMERO
Published: June 28, 2009

BOGOTÁ, Colombia — With their condemnation on Sunday of the coup ousting President Manuel Zelaya in Honduras, governments in the Western Hemisphere from across the ideological spectrum found a rare issue around which they could swiftly arrive at unity.
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Related
Honduran President Is Ousted in Coup (June 29, 2009)

At the same time, from the Obama administration’s measured response to the reaction of President Hugo Chávez of Venezuela, who put his military on alert over an apparent affront to the Venezuelan ambassador in Honduras, the responses both revealed and disguised fissures over different forms of democratic government that are taking root in the region.

On the one side are countries like Venezuela, Bolivia and Ecuador, where voters have given much greater power to their populist presidents, partly by allowing them to extend their time in office and sometimes eroding the function of Congress and the Supreme Court, institutions portrayed as allies of the old oligarchy. On the other side are nations of varying ideological hues, including Brazil, Latin America’s rising power, where resilient institutions have allowed for more diversity of participants in politics, ruling out the so-called participatory democracy that Mr. Chávez, the Venezuelan president, has been eager to promote in the region.

Mr. Zelaya himself pushed this tension with institutions to its limits in his clash with Honduras’s judiciary last week over his call for a referendum intended to clear the way for term limits to be eased. On Sunday, the Supreme Court of Honduras said that the military had acted in accordance with the Constitution to remove Mr. Zelaya.

But such legalistic arguments failed to dissuade governments from condemning the coup, particularly in countries like Chile, Argentina and Brazil, where bitter memories linger over human rights abuses by military officials that toppled civilian rulers in the 1960s and 1970s.

“The notion of military involvement in such an ouster is an anathema in much of the region,” said Peter Hakim, president of the Inter-American Dialogue, a policy group in Washington that focuses on Latin America.

Condemnations of the coup quickly united governments as ideologically disparate as Havana’s Communist rulers and conservative Colombia, a close ally of the United States. “It is a legal obligation to defend democracy in Honduras,” said Augusto Ramírez Ocampo, a former foreign minister of Colombia.

And while governments in the region may reject military ousters much more easily than, say, the civilian demonstrations that forced democratically elected leaders to resign earlier this decade in Argentina and Bolivia, the Obama administration has also shifted the way in which Washington reacts to such events.

By Sunday night, officials in Washington said they had spoken with Mr. Zelaya and were working for his return to power in Honduras, despite relations with Mr. Zelaya that had recently turned colder because of the inclusion of Honduras in the Bolivarian Alternative for the Americas, or ALBA, a leftist political alliance led by Venezuela.

The effort to engage Mr. Zelaya differed from Washington’s initial response to Venezuela’s brief coup in April 2002, when the Bush administration blamed Mr. Chávez for his own downfall and denied knowing about the planning of the coup, despite the revelation later that the Central Intelligence Agency knew developments about the plot in Caracas on the eve of its execution.


After his return to power following the 48-hour coup, Mr. Chávez demonized the Bush administration, and the ties that frayed with the United States are only now being repaired in part by the decision last week by Washington and Caracas to return ambassadors to embassies from which they had been expelled.

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/06/29/world/am...venez.html?_r=1

maybe you're right, Mex:LOL:
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06-30-2009, 05:19 PM
Post: #5
After coup, Chavez warns Honduran military
Leader says coup saved Honduras from 'Chavismo'

The newly installed Honduran President claims the military coup that brought him to power saved the country from "the shackles of a Chavez-sponsored socialism."

Roberto Micheletti, who was installed as caretaker president hours after a military coup against the constitutional president, told Reuters on Monday that the ousted President Jose Manuel Zelaya was trying to follow a socialist model set by President Hugo Chavez of Venezuela.

"President Zelaya was moving the country toward 'Chavismo'," he said. "He (Zelaya) was following this model which is not accepted by Hondurans."

Micheletti pointedly used the Spanish term, 'Chavismo' in reference to the Chavez's socialist style of rule that won him substantial popularity in Venezuela and across Latin America.

Zelaya's forced removal was promptly condemned by Organization of American States (OAS), including the United States, whose president described the move as "illegal."

Venezuela, however, was more vocal in blasting the military coup d'etat, vowing to do whatever necessary to return President Manuel Zelaya to power.

The Venezuelan president vowed to overthrow Honduran Congress leader Micheletti should he be sworn in as president.

link - http://www.presstv.ir/detail.aspx?id=99436...ionid=351020706

personally i can't think of a coup in Latin America where the CIA weren't involved. i'd be gobsmacked if this one was any different

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06-30-2009, 05:30 PM
Post: #6
After coup, Chavez warns Honduran military
Quote:Zelaya's forced removal was promptly condemned by Organization of American States (OAS), including the United States, whose president described the move as "illegal."

Be interesting to see how that develops. It's still not impossible that his possible tenure is intended to be shortened.
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06-30-2009, 06:44 PM
Post: #7
After coup, Chavez warns Honduran military
Quote:
Quote:Zelaya's forced removal was promptly condemned by Organization of American States (OAS), including the United States, whose president described the move as "illegal."

Be interesting to see how that develops. It's still not impossible that his possible tenure is intended to be shortened.
yeah, but they always say stuff like that - they cannot be seen to be supporting a coup.

tbh don't think they'll be overly bothered if Zelaya is returned to power, so long as his term is not extended.

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06-30-2009, 11:33 PM (This post was last modified: 06-30-2009 11:35 PM by ---.)
Post: #8
After coup, Chavez warns Honduran military
Quote:yeah, but they always say stuff like that - they cannot be seen to be supporting a coup.

tbh don't think they'll be overly bothered if Zelaya is returned to power, so long as his term is not extended.

Quote:Mr. Zelaya himself pushed this tension with institutions to its limits in his clash with Honduras' judiciary last week over his call for a referendum intended to clear the way for term limits to be eased. On Sunday, the Supreme Court of Honduras said that the military had acted in accordance with the Constitution to remove Mr. Zelaya.


Quote:By Sunday night, officials in Washington said they had spoken with Mr. Zelaya and were working for his return to power in Honduras, despite relations with Mr. Zelaya that had recently turned colder because of the inclusion of Honduras in the Bolivarian Alternative for the Americas, or ALBA, a leftist political alliance led by Venezuela.

Sure, but it wasn't every element in govt. thatwas out to get JFK either.
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06-30-2009, 11:59 PM
Post: #9
After coup, Chavez warns Honduran military
Quote:Sure, but it wasn't every element in govt. thatwas out to get JFK either.
yeah, i'm sure many of the little people were not - but i don't think that matters a stuff to the real powers - those for whom government and military are no more than instruments, i.e. financial and corporate interests. USA, Honduras it doesn't matter, so long as the established order is not threatened.


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07-01-2009, 12:25 AM
Post: #10
After coup, Chavez warns Honduran military
The Honduran Coup:

Another US Destabilization Operation

By Barry Grey and Rafael Azul

June 30, 2009 "WSW"
--While publicly opposing the military coup that ousted Honduran President Manuel Zelaya on Sunday, the Obama administration on Monday indicated that it will not cut off aid to the Central American country or demand Zelaya’s reinstatement.

Following a White House meeting with Washington’s closest Latin American ally, Colombian President Alvaro Uribe, President Obama reiterated the position that the ouster of Zelaya was illegal. However, Secretary of State Hillary Clinton told reporters at a State Department briefing that the US government was refraining from formally declaring the removal of Zelaya a “coup.”

Under the Foreign Assistance Act, no US aid can be given to a country whose elected head of government is removed by a military coup. The US is providing Honduras with $43 million in aid this year and maintains a major military presence in the country, including a base staffed by 600 US troops located 50 miles from the capital, Tegucigalpa. The US has also refrained from recalling its ambassador to Honduras.

Earlier on Monday, Clinton was asked whether the stated US goal of “restoring democratic order in Honduras” included returning Zelaya to the presidency. “We haven’t laid out any demands that we’re insisting on,” Clinton replied.

The official US line is that it attempted unsuccessfully to convince the Honduran military not to proceed with the coup. However, this amounts to a tacit acknowledgment that Washington was well aware of the coup plans.

Given the intimate and long-standing ties between the US and the Honduran military, the record over many decades of US-backed coups and military dictatorships in the country and the region, and the ongoing efforts to destabilize the regime of Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez, it is not credible that the US played no role in the removal of one of Chavez’s allies in Latin America.

Sunday’s coup was the culmination of an escalating political crisis in the impoverished country. Zelaya, a wealthy rancher, was elected in 2005 as the candidate of the bourgeois establishment Liberal Party. He ran on a right-wing program, but shifted in the intervening years, adopting a populist and nationalist persona in order to appease growing popular discontent, and allying himself with Cuba, Venezuela, Ecuador and Bolivia, all of which are headed by regimes considered by Washington to be hostile to US interests in Latin America.

At the beginning of June, Zelaya hosted the meeting of the Organization of American States (OAS) which provisionally removed the long-standing US-backed ban on Cuba. He was among the most strident advocates of allowing Cuba to join the organization, frustrating US efforts to maintain the political quarantine on the Castro regime.

Zelaya increasingly earned the enmity of dominant sections of the Honduran business elite, the military brass and the Church—the forces most closely allied to US imperialism. On June 12, a motorcade transporting Zelaya came under fire in Tegucigalpa. At least one bullet hit the President’s limousine, shattering the windshield.

Zelaya’s effort to hold a referendum on changing the constitution became the pretext for the coup. His opponents declared the referendum an attempt to override a constitutional limit on presidential tenure to one four-year term. The referendum proposed that a vote be held on November 29, the same day as national elections, to establish a constitutional convention.

Earlier this month the Honduran Supreme Court declared the referendum unconstitutional, and army chief General Romeo Vasquez refused to allow it to proceed. When Zelaya fired Vasquez, the Supreme Court overturned the action and reinstated the general. Last Thursday, Zelaya led a demonstration to seize referendum ballots that were being held by the military.

When Zelaya attempted on Sunday to hold the referendum, recast as a nonbinding opinion poll, the military broke into his home, arrested him and deported him to Costa Rica. The Honduran Congress, with the imprimatur of the Supreme Court, elected the parliamentary speaker, Roberto Micheletti, a member of Zelaya’s Liberal Party, as “interim president.”

The military imposed a de facto state of siege in Tegucigalpa, cutting off electricity, closing down pro-Zelaya media and reportedly arresting the foreign minister and other government officials. Cuba has charged that its ambassador to Honduras and the ambassadors from Nicaragua and Venezuela were beaten by troops carrying out the coup.

Since Sunday, a tense standoff has continued between the army and pro-Zelaya demonstrators outside the presidential palace. On Monday there were reports of tear gas attacks on demonstrators.

Zelaya has vowed to return to power, and the coup has been condemned by the US, the European Union, the OAS, the United Nations and the leaders of Venezuela, Bolivia, Nicaragua, Colombia and other countries allied with the Zelaya regime, who met Sunday night in Managua.

Chavez has, justifiably, cast the coup as an overt threat to his regime. He has charged the US with complicity, alleging involvement by Otto Reich, a long-time anti-Castro operative and favorite of anti-Castro exiles in Miami. Reich played a key role as a Reagan administration State Department official in the Iran-Contra conspiracy, in which Reagan authorized secret funding for the anti-Sandinista Contras, in violation of the Boland amendment which had been passed by Congress banning US aid to the Contra death squads.

Reich was one of a number of Iran-Contra veterans who were appointed to government posts in the administration of George W. Bush, serving as assistant secretary of state for western hemisphere affairs.

The US used southern Honduras as the base of operations for its proxy war in the 1980s against the left nationalist, Cuban-allied regime in neighboring Nicaragua.

There are parallels in the Honduran events to the abortive 2002 US-backed coup against Venezuela’s Chavez. The current US ambassador to Honduras, Hugo Llorens, undoubtedly played a significant role in that failed attempt to oust an elected Latin American president.

In 2002 and 2003, Llorens served as the director of Andean affairs on the Bush administration’s National Security Council (NSC). In that post, he was the principal adviser to the president and the NSC on issues relating to Colombia, Venezuela, Bolivia, Peru and Ecuador.

Otto Reich was also implicated in the 2002 coup attempt. He met with Venezuelan opposition figures in the run-up to the attempted ouster of Chavez.

Reich is currently a board member of the Western Hemisphere Institute for Security Cooperation, better known as the School of the Americas, located in Fort Benning, Georgia. Among the tens of thousands of Latin American military officers—and death squad leaders—who have been trained at the School of the Americas are two of the leaders of Sunday’s coup in Honduras, Army General Romeo Vasquez and Air Force General Luis Javier Prince Suazo.

Another graduate of the School of the Americas was Policarpo Paz Garcia, who ruled Honduras in 1980-82. Paz Garcia launched Battalion 3-16, one of the most feared death squads in Latin America.

Commenting on the calculations of the Obama administration, behind the official disapproval of the Honduran coup and the pro-democracy rhetoric, the intelligence web site Statfor on Monday noted that the US could exert irresistible pressure on Honduras to restore Zelaya to power, since the US provides the market for 70 percent of the country’s exports. “However,’” Stratfor wrote, “the aim of economic pressure would be for [interim President] Micheletti to make moves to support democracy, and open elections—such as those already scheduled for November 29—would easily appease the United States.”

The Washington Post reported that John Negroponte, the long-time US State Department official, said that Clinton’s remarks “appeared to reflect US reluctance to see Zelaya returned unconditionally to power.” The newspaper quoted Negroponte as saying, “I think she wants to preserve some leverage to get Zelaya to back down from his insistence on a referendum.”

Negroponte knows whereof he speaks. He was US ambassador to Honduras during the 1980s and virtually ran the US proxy war against Nicaragua that was based in Honduras.

It appears that the Obama administration is involved in an operation aimed at either permanently removing Zelaya or negotiating a return to power under conditions where his government would be weakened and its policies shifted in favor of US interests. This, in turn, would further US efforts to destabilize Chavez in Venezuela and shift the balance of power throughout Latin America.

The Obama administration has, however, learned something from the disastrous failure of the Bush administration’s botched coup against Chavez seven years ago. It is seeking to conceal its real aims behind formal opposition to the coup in Honduras and a public posture of fidelity to democratic elections.

Moreover, the US is in no position to openly support a coup in Honduras or maintain a public stance of neutrality under conditions in which it is waging a propaganda war and destabilization campaign in Iran based on allegations that the regime headed by President Ahmadinejad stole the June 12 election.

An unmistakable indicator of the real attitude of the Obama administration to the events in Honduras is the response of the US media. The media, led by the New York Times, immediately embraced the claims of the Iranian opposition that the election had been rigged and a coup had been carried out, without presenting any concrete evidence to support the allegations. It provided nonstop coverage of antigovernment demonstrations, and proclaimed the dissident faction of the clerical regime to be heading a “green revolution” for democracy.

In contrast, the US media has provided only minimal coverage of a real coup in Honduras. It has barely reported the police-state measures, arrests and beatings carried out by the Honduran military, and treated the anti-coup protests with utter indifference. On Monday evening, the events in Honduras were relegated to a mere mention on all three network news broadcasts, well behind the death of Michael Jackson.

What accounts for this stark contrast? The simple fact that the US government opposes the victor in the Iranian election and supports those who ousted Zelaya in Honduras.

The media, in particular the New York Times, which supported the 2002 coup attempt against Chavez, provides a further indication of US involvement in the Honduran coup. One month ago, as the political crisis in Honduras was heating up, the Times published a provocative article entitled “Chavez Seeks Tighter Grip on the Military.” The article retailed, without substantiation, claims of a massive crackdown by Chavez against dissidents within the Venezuelan military. This article, undoubtedly written on assignment from the CIA, was a certain indicator that the US was preparing subversion in the region.

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link - http://informationclearinghouse.info/article22952.htm

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